This course presents chemical concepts that are required for a fundamental understanding of the physical and life sciences. It explores the qualitative aspects of matter with such topics as: atomic structure, the periodic table and periodic trends; Lewis, valence bond and molecular orbital bonding models; bond polarity and intermolecular interactions; nomenclature of organic compounds, functional groups, and common organic reactions; and characterization of chemical compounds using spectroscopic methods. It briefly reviews nomenclature of inorganic compounds, dimensional analysis, chemical equations, stoichiometry, empirical and molecular formula, percent mass, and other foundational concepts. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours, regular tutorials) (Distribution: Natural Science-c) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Sir James Dunn Building 113.
This course presents chemical concepts that are required for a fundamental understanding of the physical and life sciences. It explores the qualitative aspects of matter with such topics as: atomic structure, the periodic table and periodic trends; Lewis, valence bond and molecular orbital bonding models; bond polarity and intermolecular interactions; nomenclature of organic compounds, functional groups, and common organic reactions; and characterization of chemical compounds using spectroscopic methods. It briefly reviews nomenclature of inorganic compounds, dimensional analysis, chemical equations, stoichiometry, empirical and molecular formula, percent mass, and other foundational concepts. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours, regular tutorials) (Distribution: Natural Science-c) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Sir James Dunn Building 113.
This course provides an in-depth look at the structures, reactivity, and synthesis of important functional groups in organic chemistry, starting with the reactions of alkenes. It emphasizes resonance, reaction mechanisms (arrow pushing), conformational analysis, stereochemistry, and organic synthesis, and introduces IR and proton NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Flemington 116.
Lewis acid-base chemistry and applications to transition metals will be discussed. Concepts covered will include structure and bonding, ligand field theory, magnetism and electronics. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: CHEM 3311) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Flemington 116.
This course covers the following topics with an emphasis on problem solving: the treatment of errors and statistics of measurements; aqueous solutions, complex equilibria (including acid/base and buffer systems); electrochemistry theory; redox, electrode potentials (ion selective electrodes), and electrogravimetry. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: CHEM 3411) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon 118.
This course presents the principles of organic chemistry as they apply to biochemical problems. Topics covered include enzymic reaction mechanisms, enzyme cofactors, peptide and nucleic acid synthesis, and enzymes in organic synthesis. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with BIOC 3131 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline. Chemistry students should register for CHEM 3131.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to 9:20AM Avard Dixon 112.
This course examines physical and chemical applications of kinetics, including those related to reaction mechanisms and dynamics. Specific topics include: experimental methods in kinetics; introduction to quantum mechanics needed to understand chemical kinetics; the potential energy surface (PES) for a chemical reaction and the effects of different features of the PES on the rate of chemical reactions; the effects of zero point energy and quantum tunneling on reaction rates. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with PHYS 3231 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: CHEM 3221; any version of CHEM 3231 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Sir James Dunn Building 104.
This course examines the changes in physical and chemical properties that arise when systems are confined to nanoscale dimensions and discusses applications in electronics, photonics, and biotechnology. Topics may include: quantum confinement, scanning probe techniques, localized surface plasmon resonance, self-assembled monolayers, nanoparticle synthesis, and biological applications. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: CHEM 3991-Nanoscience and Nanotechnology -14/WI, 16/WI) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Crabtree M2.
This course examines structure and bonding in main group compounds and discusses ionic and covalent bonding with respect to Lewis, valence shell electron pair repulsion, valence bond and molecular orbital theories as well as periodic trends and a survey of the properties and reactions of the elements of groups 1, 2 and 13 - 18. It presents an overview of state of the art spectroscopic techniques and their applications. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Crabtree 223.
This course examines the roles metals play in biochemical systems, and includes an overview of bioinorganic chemistry and a discussion of metals in medicine. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with BIOC 4351 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline. Honours Chemistry students should register for CHEM 4351.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 to 9:50AM Crabtree 223.
This course investigates chemical aspects of the environment and draws upon physical, organic, inorganic and analytical chemistry. It explores the natural chemical compositions of and anthropogenic effects on air, water and soil. Topics include ozone chemistry, smog, acid rain, global climate, DOM, metals, colloids, pE/pH, soil chemistry and wastes. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours,Tutorials 1.5 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Avard Dixon 111.
This is a course for Honours students in Chemistry which critically evaluates a wide range of topics from the current literature in all branches of Chemistry. Students are expected to deliver seminars on topics outside of their thesis area and to present preliminary thesis results. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Hart Hall 319.