This course introduces the study of Economics and the nature of microeconomic problems including the behaviour of consumers and firms in different markets, and the results of their actions as manifested in production, costs, and prices, market efficiency, and market failure. [Note 1: Students should normally have completed a university preparatory level course in Mathematics.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1 Hour) (Distribution: Social World-c)(Exclusion: ECON 1000) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Crabtree M14.
This course introduces the study of Economics and the nature of macroeconomic problems such as the determinants of the level of national income, employment, and the accompanying stabilization problems and policies. Topics also include money and banking, international trade, exchange rates, and the problems of inflation. [Note 1: Students should normally have completed a university preparatory level course in Mathematics.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1 Hour) (Distribution: Social World-c)(Exclusion: ECON 1000)
This course introduces students to statistical concepts used in the examination of data generated in uncontrolled environments with particular emphasis on investigating social and economic phenomena. Topics include data collection, descriptive statistics, probability concepts, statistical estimation, and hypothesis testing. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 to 9:50AM Avard Dixon 112.
This course presents microeconomic theory and its applications relating to consumer decisions. Topics covered include: scope and method of microeconomics; demand and consumer behaviour; choices under uncertainty; intertemporal decisions making; asymmetric information; externalities and public goods; and exchange equilibrium and economic efficiency. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of ECON 2001 previously offered with a different title) Tuesday and Thursday 2:30 to 3:50PM Barclay 021.
Theories of national income, employment, inflation, balance of payments, and stabilization policy within the framework of macroeconomic models of a open economy. The focus of the course will be on short-run macroeconomic analysis and policy. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Barclay 021.
An introduction to economic issues in the health care system. The course examines applications of economic principles and empirical analysis to the study of health and health policies in Canadian and International contexts. Topics may include: the demand for health care, the supply of health services through health practitioners and hospitals, the economic effects of health insurance, pharmaceutical markets, economic evaluation techniques for health, health technology assessment and public policy formulation. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon 230.
This course introduces the basic tools and methods of Game Theory. Game Theory is a mathematically oriented approach to understanding the strategic interaction of self-interested agents. Emphasis is on non-cooperative games. Topics include backwards induction, iterative deletion of dominated strategies, Nash equilibrium, repeated games, some equilibrium refinements, evolutionary game theory, and Bayesian Nash equilibria. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as MATH 3301 and therefore may count as 3 credits in either discipline. Note 2: Counts as a Commerce elective for students taking a Bachelor of Commerce or a Major or Minor in Commerce] (Format: Lecture 3 hours, Laboratory 1 Hour) Monday Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to 9:20AM Barclay 021.
This course covers economic theories of economic growth and technological change and their application in the study of the historical evolution of the world economy. Historical sections of the course will selectively cover materials on Canada, the US, Europe, Asia, and the developing world. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 to 2:20PM Avard Dixon G12.
The application of economic analysis in the study of environmental problems. Students will examine when and why markets often fail to allocate sufficient resources to environmental conservation, and will critically assess different policy instruments available to correct for the fundamental market failure. Using the analytical methods developed in this course, the following type of policies will be examined: measures to control air and water pollution, the disposal of hazardous wastes, the protection of endangered species, and the control of cross border pollution, including the Canadian Green Plan. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Barclay 021.
Issues examined will include the pure economic theory of international trade and important institutions (the FTA, NAFTA, the EC, GATT, etc.), plus problems and policies associated with trade in goods and services. Students will examine issues such as free trade and protectionism and the gains and losses resulting from globalization. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 1:30 to 2:20PM Barclay 021.
This course focuses on the work of classical economists (especially Adam Smith, David Ricardo, and Thomas Malthus) and the economic theories of Karl Marx. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Avard Dixon 116.
The course develops tools and techniques for analyzing problems in microeconomics. These include modern theories of the consumer and of the firm, general equilibrium, and welfare theorems. [Note 1: Counts as a Commerce elective for students taking a Bachelor of Commerce or a Major or Minor in Commerce. Note 2: Although not required, the Economics Department recommends that students complete MATH 2111 and MATH 2221 prior to undertaking ECON 4801. Note 3: Honours students who wish to pursue graduate studies in economics are strongly advised to take this course.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of ECON 4801 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon 116.