This course introduces the creators, conventions, and devices of Science Fiction, focusing primarily on the short story; however, selected examples of other representative forms will be chosen to illustrate the range and variety of the genre.

This course, offered in several sections each year, introduces students to critical approaches to the reading of, and writing about, literature. Each section has its own reading list, set by the individual instructor and including a balanced representation of prose, fiction, poetry and drama, taken from a range of historical periods.[Note 1: Students who wish to pursue courses in English at the 2000 level and above must take ENGL 1201.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 1001) Monday and Wednesday 1:30 to 2:50PM Avard Dixon 111.
This course, offered in several sections each year, introduces students to critical approaches to the reading of, and writing about, literature. Each section has its own reading list, set by the individual instructor and including a balanced representation of prose, fiction, poetry and drama, taken from a range of historical periods.[Note 1: Students who wish to pursue courses in English at the 2000 level and above must take ENGL 1201.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 1001) Tuesday and Thursday 2:30 to 3:50PM Avard Dixon 111.
This course, offered in several sections each year, introduces students to critical approaches to the reading of, and writing about, literature. Each section has its own reading list, set by the individual instructor and including a balanced representation of prose, fiction, poetry and drama, taken from a range of historical periods.[Note 1: Students who wish to pursue courses in English at the 2000 level and above must take ENGL 1201.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 1001) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Sir James Dunn Building 106.
This course, offered in several sections each year, introduces students to critical approaches to the reading of, and writing about, literature. Each section has its own reading list, set by the individual instructor and including a balanced representation of prose, fiction, poetry and drama, taken from a range of historical periods.[Note 1: Students who wish to pursue courses in English at the 2000 level and above must take ENGL 1201.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 1001) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon 111.
This course, offered in several sections each year, introduces students to critical approaches to the reading of, and writing about, literature. Each section has its own reading list, set by the individual instructor and including a balanced representation of prose, fiction, poetry and drama, taken from a range of historical periods.[Note 1: Students who wish to pursue courses in English at the 2000 level and above must take ENGL 1201.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 1001) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon 111.
This course introduces the elements of poetry, including image, figure, rhythm, and form, and surveys outstanding achievements in the English tradition of poetry. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 2011) Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 to 9:50AM Crabtree M10.
This course will examine the two major prose genres of the novel and the short story; selected examples of representative forms will be chosen to illustrate the range and variety of both genres. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 2031; ENGL 2041) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Avard Dixon 112.
This course introduces students to a wide range of Shakespeares plays. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 2311; ENGL 2321; ENGL 3300) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Ralph Pickard Bell Library 316.
This course presents an introductory overview of Canadian literature from its beginnings to the present. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 2800) Tuesday and Thursday 2:30 to 3:50PM Hart Hall 319.
A study of the poetry and prose which emerged from the political, religious, and social revolutions of the mid-seventeenth century, including the work of Marvell, Milton, and Bunyan. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 3350) Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 to 2:20PM Avard Dixon 120.
This course focuses on affinities between printed and cinematic narrative forms, introducing students as well to some of the principles of semiotics, and to the place of film theory within the context of cultural studies more generally. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 2 Hours) [Note 1: This course may count as 3 credits in Art History.] Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Ralph Pickard Bell Library 316. Monday 1:30 to 4:19PM Ralph Pickard Bell Library 316.
A study of American Literature from 1865 to the present. This course examines American writing and culture during the period when the United States became a colonial and, later, a world power. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 3721 Twentieth Century American Literature) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Hart Hall 218.
This course offers an introduction to the literature of the Caribbean Islands since 1945. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 3761 Literatures of South East Asia and Caribbean) Tuesday and Thursday 2:30 to 3:50PM Hart Hall 101.
This course offers an introduction to various contemporary theories of literature; diverse approaches, such as structuralist, semiotic, post-structuralist and deconstructive will be examined. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 3880) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Hart Hall 101.
This course examines closely selected topics drawn from pre-1800 English literature. [Note 1: ENGL 4221 may be taken for credit more than once if the topic differs] (Format: Seminar 3 Hours) Wednesday 1:30 to 4:20PM Crabtree M3.