This course introduces the concepts, problems, and methods of modern scientific psychology. Topics include neuroanatomy and other aspects of the biological bases of psychological processes, learning, motivation, sensation, perception, aspects of cognition, memory, and language. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Distribution: Natural Science-b) Monday Wednesday and Friday 1:30 to 2:20PM Crabtree M14.
A general introduction to the concepts, problems, and methods of modern scientific psychology. Topics surveyed include attitudes, stereotyping and other aspects of social psychology, developmental psychology, intelligence, aspects of cognition and language, personality, and the psychology of abnormal behaviour. PSYC 1001 and 1011 may be taken in either order. Neither is a prerequisite to the other. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to 9:20AM Crabtree M14.
This course considers a range of research strategies, including descriptive, correlational, experimental, and quasi-experimental research designs. Other topics include the research process, ethics in research, defining and measuring variables, sampling, and writing a research report. The use of descriptive statistics to evaluate the results of carefully planned research is also described. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1 Hour) Monday Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to 9:20AM Barclay 02.
In this lecture and laboratory course, students will be provided with a basic foundation in the neural bases of behavior. Topics will include the role of evolution and genetics in the development of the nervous system, the structure and function of the nervous system, and the biological bases of perception, movement, eating, drinking, sleeping and dreaming, sexual behaviour, addiction and reward, and memory. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1 Hour) (Exclusion: PSYC 2051) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Flemington 116.
This lecture and laboratory course provides an overview of mental processes and activities used in perceiving, learning, remembering, thinking, and understanding. This course will offer students an opportunity to explore current information processing models and their applications. Some of the topics surveyed include attention, memory, language, neurocognition and thinking and reasoning. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1 Hour) (Exclusion: PSYC 3021 Cognition) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Flemington 116.
This course is an overview of social, cognitive, and biological development during infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Some of the topics covered include the development of perception, memory, emotions, and family relationships, puberty, identity, peer groups, and adolescent sexuality. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: PSYC 2401; PSYC 2411) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Barclay 02.
This course will present an overview of psychological disorders: their biological and social origins, classification, symptoms and common treatments. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: PSYC 3061) Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 to 9:50AM Sir James Dunn Building 113.
This lecture and laboratory course examines the role of associative processes in both human and non-human learning. Topics will include habituation, classical conditioning, operant conditioning, and observational learning. [Note 1: PSYC 2001 and 2011 strongly recommended as additional prerequisites.] (Exclusion: PSYC 3011 Conditioning) (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Crabtree 223.
This lecture and laboratory course examines contemporary research and theories of human memory. Topics covered will include short-term and long-term memory, forgetting, implicit memory, amnesia, memory and aging, reconstructive processes, mnemonics and imagery. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1.5 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Crabtree M10.
This course examines psychological perspectives on issues related to death, dying, and bereavement. Topics include hospice palliative care, end-of-life decisions, suicide, euthanasia, funeral practices, dealing with grief and bereavement, and cross-cultural perspectives on and attitudes toward death and dying. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Avard Dixon 118.
This course is an overview of social, cognitive, and biological development during early, middle, and especially late adulthood. Topics include: age-related changes in the central nervous system; dementia; late-life changes in intellectual abilities, memory and sensory processes; and the effects of age on personality and interpersonal relationships. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: PSYC 2421) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Barclay 021.
This course systematically reviews psychological theories and research findings about gender. Topics include biological effects on gender development, gender roles, health and reproduction, personality and social interaction, work, sexuality, gendered violence, and mental health. It also considers the ways that race, ethnicity, class, physical ability, sexual orientation, and age modify womens and mens experience. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: PSYC 2501; any version of PSYC 3511 previously offered with a different title) Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 to 9:50AM Avard Dixon G12.
This course will use a seminar format. Specific topics in the field of Adulthood and Aging will be explored in depth (e.g., health and communication across adulthood, collaborative cognition, memory and comprehension of verbal and written information, etc). Theory and research methodology in life-span psychology will also be covered. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours) Thursday 1:00 to 3:50PM Crabtree 202.
A seminar for honours students in Psychology that will involve consideration of metatheoretical, psychometric, and ethical issues that inevitably arise in the course of virtually any type of psychological inquiry. In addition to the critical evaluation of classic articles on these topics, students will make periodic presentations of their own ongoing research, which will be open to all members of the Department. (Format: Seminar 2 Hours) Friday 1:30 to 3:20PM Crabtree 202.
This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. [Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for PSYC 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Independent Study)
This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. [Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for PSYC 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Independent Study)
This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. [Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for PSYC 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Independent Study)
This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for PSYC 4991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable) Tuesday 1:00 to 3:50PM Sir James Dunn Building 406.