This course introduces the study of Economics and the nature of microeconomic problems including the behaviour of consumers and firms in different markets, and the results of their actions as manifested in production, costs, and prices, market efficiency, and market failure. [Note 1: Students should normally have completed a university preparatory level course in Mathematics.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1 Hour) (Distribution: Social World-c)(Exclusion: ECON 1000)
This course introduces the study of Economics and the nature of macroeconomic problems such as the determinants of the level of national income, employment, and the accompanying stabilization problems and policies. Topics also include money and banking, international trade, exchange rates, and the problems of inflation. [Note 1: Students should normally have completed a university preparatory level course in Mathematics.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1 Hour) (Distribution: Social World-c)(Exclusion: ECON 1000) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Sir James Dunn Building 113.
This course presents microeconomic theory and its applications relating to producer decisions. Topics include: the theory of production and cost; profit maximization and competitive supply; pricing with market power; monopoly and monopsony; monopolistic competition and oligopoly; game theory and strategic interactions; markets for inputs and income distribution; markets and asymmetric information; analysis of markets and effects of government policies; and the theory of the firm and team production. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: any version of ECON 2011 previously offered with a different title) Monday and Wednesday 4:30 to 5:50PM Barclay 021.
A continuation of macroeconomic analysis in the context of the long-run. Topics include long-run consumption functions, investment and real business cycles, economic growth and productivity, and the monetary theories of the classical economists, Keynes, and Friedman. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Barclay 021.
This course introduces analytical methods used by social scientists examining Canadian social and economic policy by studying issues that arise perennially. Topics may include: unemployment and government policy, Canada and the global economy, social security reform, regionalism, education policy, health policy, and inflation. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of ECON 2301 previously offered with a different title) Tuesday and Thursday 2:30 to 3:50PM Avard Dixon 116.
This course introduces statistical tools for handling data generated in uncontrolled environments and the techniques involved in their use. Topics include estimation and inference of single- and multi-variable regression models, large sample techniques, dummy variables, heteroskedasticity, and an introduction to times series. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of ECON 2701 previously offered with a different title) Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 to 9:50AM Avard Dixon 118.
The purpose of this course is to introduce students in social science disciplines to survey research methods. To achieve this goal, students will be taken through the complete survey development process. This will involve not only the development and administration of a survey questionnaire, sample selection, and statistical analysis but also collaboration with survey developers and parties interested in the survey administration. Presentation techniques will also be covered. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ECON 4981 Data Analysis I; ECON 4981 Data Analysis II; ECON 4981 Data and Research) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Avard Dixon 115.
This course examines the financial side of international trade. The focus is on exchange rates, the balance of international payments, alternative means of adjustment to shocks in the international economy, and international monetary arrangements. [Note 1: Counts as a Commerce elective for students taking a Bachelor of Commerce or a Major or Minor in Commerce.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 1:30 to 2:20PM Barclay 021.
This course examines positive and normative approaches to taxation and fiscal federalism with special emphasis on issues in Canadian Public Finance. [Note 1: Counts as a Commerce elective for students taking a Bachelor of Commerce or a Major or Minor in Commerce.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Avard Dixon 120.
This course focuses on differences in the patterns of economic development in the world economy. It examines the developing world, national and international policies designed to improve the global distribution of income, and the economic development policies of the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the United Nations. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ECON 3551) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon 230.
This course provides an overview of central theories of industrial organization, examining market power, the theory of the firm, and strategic behaviour, within classic and dynamic oligopoly theoretical frameworks. It makes explicit use of game theoretic techniques where appropriate. Topics may include: collusive and competitive behaviour, non-linear pricing, commitment and repeated games, and entry deterrence. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ECON 3611) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Avard Dixon 230.
This course introduces many of the models that form the foundation of modern macroeconomics, including growth, network, and search-and-matching models. The core organizing principle of the course is the concept of general equilibrium, emphasizing tools and techniques for deriving equilibrium properties of the models. [Note 1: Counts as a Commerce elective for students taking a Bachelor of Commerce or a Major or Minor in Commerce. Note 2: Although not required, the Economics Department recommends that students complete MATH 2111 and MATH 2221 prior to undertaking ECON 4801. Note 3: Honours students who wish to pursue graduate studies in economics are strongly advised to take this course.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of ECON 4811 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to 9:20AM Avard Dixon 120.
The course examines the roles played by uncertainty and asymmetric information in the allocation of resources. It also uses tools of probability theory to examine strategic interaction. Honours students who wish to pursue graduate studies in economics are strongly advised to take this course. [Note 1: Counts as a Commerce elective for students taking a Bachelor of Commerce or a Major or Minor in Commerce.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Avard Dixon 120.
A student fulfilling requirements for an Honours degree may elect to undertake a research and writing project of acceptable scope and quality under the supervision of faculty members in Economics. The student must submit a formal proposal to the Department prior to registration. [Note 1: Written permission of the Department required. Note 2: Counts as a Commerce elective for students taking a Bachelor of Commerce or a Major or Minor in Commerce.] (Format: Independent Study/Thesis)