This course introduces differential calculus. Topics include derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric, and exponential functions and applications such as curve sketching, related rates, and optimization problems. [Note 1: This course has a Challenge for Credit option; see Calendar Section 3.11] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1.5 Hours)(Distribution: Natural Science-a) (Exclusion: MATH 1151; any version of MATH 1111 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to 9:20AM Sir James Dunn Building 113.
This course continues the introduction to calculus begun in MATH 1111. Topics include techniques of integration; applications of the integral such as finding volumes and solving elementary differential equations; and sequences and series. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1.5 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of MATH 1121 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Sir James Dunn Building 113.
This course introduces first and second order differential equations. Topics include techniques for solving simple differential equations and the qualitative analysis of linear and non-linear equations. Applications include growth and decay, heating and cooling, and mixing and chemical reactions. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of MATH 2121 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 1:30 to 2:20PM Flemington 103.
An introductory course in linear algebra covering such topics as linear equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations, inner products, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Whenever possible, concepts are given a geometric interpretation in two and three-dimensional space. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon 118.
This is a second course in the concepts and techniques of probability and statistics. The course covers a selection of topics from analysis of variance, linear and nonlinear regression, correlation estimation and prediction, independence, Wilcoxon and goodness-of-fit tests and includes data analysis using statistical software. Examples come from a wide variety of sources and disciplines. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1 Hour) Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Sir James Dunn Building 106.
This course provides students with a selection of mathematical skills needed in more advanced physics courses. It introduces frequently utilized mathematical methods in theoretical physics in close connection with physics applications. Topics include vector and tensor analysis, use of special functions, operators and eigenvalue problems, Fourier analysis, and complex variable techniques. [Note 1: This course is cross listed as PHYS 3451 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 to 9:50AM Sir James Dunn Building 104.
An introduction to the simulation technique for studying mathematical models. Specific titles include: systems theory and system models, continuous system simulation, discrete system simulation, Monte Carlo methods, random number generators, and simulation languages. Emphasis will be placed upon computer implementation of the methods studied. [Note 1: This course is cross listed as COMP 3531 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Sir James Dunn Building 406.
This course introduces metric and topological spaces, convergence, and continuous functions. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Sir James Dunn Building 406.