This course introduces differential calculus. Topics include derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric, and exponential functions and applications such as curve sketching, related rates, and optimization problems. [Note 1: This course has a Challenge for Credit option; see Calendar Section 3.11] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1.5 Hours)(Distribution: Natural Science-a) (Exclusion: MATH 1151; any version of MATH 1111 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to 9:20AM Sir James Dunn Building 113.
This course continues the introduction to calculus begun in MATH 1111. Topics include techniques of integration; applications of the integral such as finding volumes and solving elementary differential equations; and sequences and series. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1.5 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of MATH 1121 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Sir James Dunn Building 113.
This course introduces first and second order differential equations. Topics include techniques for solving simple differential equations and the qualitative analysis of linear and non-linear equations. Applications include growth and decay, heating and cooling, and mixing and chemical reactions. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of MATH 2121 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 1:30 to 2:20PM Flemington 103.
An introductory course in linear algebra covering such topics as linear equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations, inner products, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Whenever possible, concepts are given a geometric interpretation in two and three-dimensional space. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon 118.
This course covers analytic functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations, conformal mapping, complex integrals, Cauchys integral theorem, Taylor and Laurent Series, residues,evaluation of real integrals, and inverse transforms. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours; Exclusion MATH 4131) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Avard Dixon G10.
This course introduces numerical methods for solving a variety of problems in mathematics, the natural sciences, and engineering and the implementation of numerical methods on a computer. Topics include numerical stability, polynomial approximation and interpolation, integration and solution of differential equations, solution of linear and nonlinear systems of equations, and matrix factorization. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as COMP 3411 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 to 2:20PM Sir James Dunn Building 106.
This course introduces metric and topological spaces, convergence, and continuous functions. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Sir James Dunn Building 406.