This course introduces the concepts, problems, and methods of modern scientific psychology. Topics include neuroanatomy and other aspects of the biological bases of psychological processes, learning, motivation, sensation, perception, aspects of cognition, memory, and language. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Distribution: Natural Science-b) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Crabtree M14.
A general introduction to the concepts, problems, and methods of modern scientific psychology. Topics surveyed include attitudes, stereotyping and other aspects of social psychology, developmental psychology, intelligence, aspects of cognition and language, personality, and the psychology of abnormal behaviour. PSYC 1001 and 1011 may be taken in either order. Neither is a prerequisite to the other. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to 9:20AM Crabtree M14.
This course covers the research process from the development of simple and complex research designs to statistical analyses of the data collected. Topics covered include analysis of variance, correlation analysis, and nonparametric approaches. It also introduces a statistical software package. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1 Hour) (Exclusion: PSYC 2101 Research Design and Analysis) Tuesday and Thursday 11:20 to 12:50PM Sir James Dunn Building 113.
Basic concepts and theories involved in the psychology of learning, the analysis of behaviour and behavioural assessment will be discussed in the context of real life problems. Applications of behaviour modification and behaviour therapy will be discussed in terms of problems associated with parenting, development of social skills, education, disabilities, health and other issues. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: PSYC 2011 Learning and Memory) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon G12.
A lecture and laboratory course introducing students to the field of social psychology. Topics covered will include social cognition, attitudes, prejudice and discrimination, interpersonal attraction, social influence, helping and aggression, and group processes. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1 Hour) (Exclusion: PSYC 3081) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Flemington 116.
This course will provide an introduction to the psychology of health, including the ways in which thoughts, emotions, and behavior influence ones health. This course will cover both current research and theory in health psychology. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Avard Dixon G12.
This course will provide an introduction to personality as an enduring, organized pattern of thinking, feeling and behaving. The course will examine key theorists and broader perspectives on personality, as well as the measurement of personality from those perspectives. Examples of perspectives may include dispositional, biological, psychoanalytic, learning, and phenomenological. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: PSYC 3071) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Crabtree M14.
This lecture and laboratory course provides the student with advanced analytic and design tools necessary to interpret the research of others and to conduct original research. Lectures will be supplemented by labs in which students will have an opportunity to practice their skills in answering questions of practical and theoretical interest. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Crabtree 223.
This course explores principles of pharmacology, neural transmission, behavioural assessment of drug effects, theories of addiction, tolerance, and dependence as a conceptual introduction to behavioural pharmacology. It discusses specific psychopharmacologic issues pertaining to alcohol, benzodiazepines, barbiturates, opiates, psychomotor stimulants, caffeine, tobacco, hallucinogens, and antipsychotic drugs. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: PSYC 2111) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Sir James Dunn Building 108.
This course will examine how physical energy is translated into sensory information and processed into our perceptions of the world around us. Topics covered will include the psychophysics and neural coding of each of our senses as well as the higher order processes of attention and cognition. In addition to lectures, students are required to participate in scheduled laboratory sessions. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1 Hour) (Exclusion: PSYC 3121 Sensation and Perception) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Crabtree 223.
This course examines the relationship between psychology and the legal system. Topics include: police psychology, eyewitness testimony, jury decision-making, risk-assessment in legal situations, violent offenders, and psychopaths. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1.5 Hours) (Exclusion: PSYC 3991 Forensic Psychology) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Barclay 021.
This course examines human sexuality from a multidisciplinary perspective. Topics include physiology and anatomy, sexual behavior, sexual orientation, reproduction, sexual health, and sexual problems and solutions. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 to 9:50AM Avard Dixon G12.
This course introduces the main theoretical perspectives, strategies of diagnosis and assessment, and types of intervention used in clinical psychology. Lectures focus on developing a framework for conceptualizing psychological problems, on the basics of interviewing and using psychological tests, and on different types of clinical treatments. It also explores specialized areas of clinical psychology such as child psychology, clinical neuropsychology, and forensic psychology. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: PSYC 3501 Introduction to Clinical Psychology) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Flemington 116.
This course places the problems and concepts of contemporary psychology in a historical context by surveying the philosophical roots of pyschological research and clinical practice. It covers the development of psychology from antiquity to the present. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 4:00 to 5:20PM Avard Dixon G12.
This course explores the emerging discipline of social neuroscience with a focus on the interaction between environment, behavior, and biology. Methods covered include research in social psychology, neuroendocrinology, neuroimaging (e.g., fMRI, PET), and neurophysiology (e.g., EEG). Topics covered include emotion, behavioral regulation, motivational systems, perceptions of self and others, social hierarchies, and social learning.
This research seminar in psychoneuroimmunology examines how interactions among behaviour, the nervous system, and the immune system influence health. The broad focus is on relationships among brain, behaviour, and immunity from a life-span perspective and on the implications for disease management within various areas of behavioural medicine.(Format: Seminar 3 Hours) (Exclusion: PSYC 4501 Advanced Topics in Health Psychology) Thursday 1:00 to 3:50PM Sir James Dunn Building 104.
This course presents an in-depth examination of theory and research pertinent to a topic of current interest in the field of Personality. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours) Tuesday 1:00 to 3:50PM Sir James Dunn Building 406.
This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. [Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for PSYC 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Independent Study)
This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. [Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for PSYC 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Independent Study)
This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for PSYC 4991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable) Wednesday 1:30 to 4:20PM Crabtree 202.