The continuation of SPAN 1101, this course focuses on elements of Spanish grammar and pronunciation through practice and reading of prescribed texts. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1 Hour) (Exclusion: SPAN 1100) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Crabtree 223.
The continuation of SPAN 1101, this course focuses on elements of Spanish grammar and pronunciation through practice and reading of prescribed texts. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1 Hour) (Exclusion: SPAN 1100) Monday Wednesday and Friday 1:30 to 2:20PM Avard Dixon G10.
The continuation of SPAN 1101, this course focuses on elements of Spanish grammar and pronunciation through practice and reading of prescribed texts. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1 Hour) (Exclusion: SPAN 1100) Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 to 2:20PM Avard Dixon 120.
This course introduces Latin American cultures through selected literacy texts, films, and other readings, in their historical and social contexts. [Note 1: Language of instruction is English.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Distribution: Arts-a/b) (Exclusion: SPAN 2011) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon 120.
The continuation of SPAN 2101, this course combines intermediate Spanish grammar, translation, oral practice, and reading of prescribed texts with a further introduction to Hispanic literatures and cultures. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1 Hour) (Exclusion: SPAN 2100) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Barclay 021.
A continuation of the Advanced Spanish Language course, primarily through literary texts from Spain and Latin America. This course includes intensive practice in writing, translation, and oral expression, and offers an introduction to Hispanic Literatures that is a prerequisite (or, with permission from the Department, a co-requisite) for all Hispanic Studies courses numbered 3200 and higher. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to 9:20AM Avard Dixon 112.
This course examines the representation of gender in various time periods, in both canonical and untraditional texts. Topics may include: homosexuality in Hispano-Roman poetry, medieval Hispano-Arab jarchas, and Movida-era literature (post Franco), transvestism and de-masculinization, orientalization, and the representation of women and non-Spanish men, and feminist voices. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Avard Dixon G10.
This course explores the economic, political, and social impacts of romantic relationships in Spanish literarure as well as the power dynamics involved in them. It emphasizes the development of Don Juan and his female analogue, Doa Juana, as comedic constructs that criticised mores regulating sex and coupling practices, illustrating the material advantages and disadvantages of seduction. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 to 2:20PM Avard Dixon G10.