This course examines the practices and beliefs associated with food in five East Asian religious traditions: Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, folk or popular religion, and Shinto. It introduces religious prescriptions and prohibitions related to food cultivation, storage, distribution, preparation, and consumption. Topics include connections between food practices and hierarchy and the roles that food plays in creating and sustaining relationships such as those between humans, living and dead, and non-humans. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: RELG 2991 Food Practices and East Asian Religions) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon G12.
This survey course focuses on the historical events and processes that led to the formation of modern Asia since the nineteenth century. Central to this story are the ways in which the peoples of this diverse region have struggled to understand, adapt to, and simultaneously re-define their understanding of what it means to be modern. (Format: Lecture/Tutorial, 3 Hours) (Distribution: Humanities-b) (Exclusion: HIST 2700; any version of HIST 2731 previously offered with a different title) Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 to 2:20PM Avard Dixon 112.
A study of the art and archaeology of peninsular Italy from the Iron Age to the period of the Julio-Claudian emperors. It will examine Etruscan culture and its interaction with the Greeks and Romans, the rise of Rome, and the transitions from republic to empire. The material culture of Italy will be explored through the architecture, sculpture, painting, and minor arts. [Note 1: This course may count as 3 credits in Art History.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 to 9:50AM Sir James Dunn Building 108.
This course introduces current topics and advances in Biochemistry and engages students in the scope and activities of the discipline. It examines the central role of water in biological systems, leading to an introduction of acid-base equilibria, the properties of biological membranes, and the bioenergetics of solutes moving across membranes. It introduces the principles of carbon bonding and electronegativity, leading to coverage of the bioorganic functional groups, whose characteristic properties and reactions combine to create the highly complex biological macromolecule classes of carbohydrates, proteins,nucleic acids, and lipids. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1.5 Hours) (Distribution: Natural Science-b) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Crabtree M14.
This course examines the relations between protein structure and function at the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary levels; enzyme catalysis and mechanism; isolation, purification, and characterization of proteins; the metabolism of proteins through synthesis and degradation; and recent trends in protein design. Students learn sequence comparison, motif searching, and development of visual protein structures constructed from the protein structural data bases available over the web. The course introduces mass spectroscopic analyses of the proteome and protein sequencing. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Crabtree M2.
This course covers the metabolism of major classes of lipids, their roles in signal transduction, and their interactions with proteins. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Sir James Dunn Building 106.
This course introduces the fundamentals of organismal biology: the scientific method, principles of evolution including Darwins theory of natural selection, adaptations in organismal form and function, biodiversity, the interactions of organisms with their environment, and the practices of scientific communication. [Note 1: This course is designed for science majors. Students who intend to continue to study in Biology should note the need to complete BIOC 1001 as a prerequisite for BIOL 1501.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of BIOL 1001 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Crabtree M14.
This course applies biological principles to practical human concerns. It introduces the development, structure and function of the human body, and mechanisms involved in degenerative infectious diseases, discusses human reproduction and genetics, examines the impact of evolutionary theory on our understanding of the human species, considers the interdependence between natural ecosystems and human activities, and looks at threats to the environment through pollution and overpopulation. [Note 1: This course is restricted to non-science majors. Science majors require the instructors permission to enrol.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Distribution: Natural Science-b) Monday Wednesday and Friday 1:30 to 2:20PM Flemington 116.
This course introduces current concepts of population and community ecology using local ecosystems and organisms, principally aquatic insects, whenever possible. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of BIOL 2101 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to 9:20AM Flemington 116.
This course will survey the functional and evolutionary diversity of organisms that are too small to be seen with the naked eye. This includes: Archaea, Bacteria, prions, viruses and selected eukaryotic microbes such as fungi, protozoa and algae. We will examine the cellular structures, evolutionary history and metabolic processes characteristic of each group, with an important emphasis on similarities and differences between microorganisms. The course will also examine how genomic sequencing is altering our views of microbial evolution and ecology.
This course explains the core molecular structures of the immune system: antibodies and their interactions with antigens. It places these molecular interactions in the context of the cells and tissues of the immune system and the signaling cascades that regulate immune responses. The course concludes with topics in immunology and applications of immunochemistry. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with BIOC 3051 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: BIOC 4011) Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 to 9:50AM Barclay 021.
This course investigates theoretical and observed changes in ecologically significant traits. It explores the connections between ecological properties of populations and evolutionary forces at work through the study of population structure, mathematical treatment of models, quantitative traits, and natural selection on phenotypic traits. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Flemington 103.
An introduction to the study of birds through lectures, laboratories and field trips. All of the bird families represented in the Maritime region will be discussed, with special emphasis on anatomy, structural adaptations, behaviour and physiology. The species composing the bird communities of the Sackville area will be examined during field trips. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory/Field Trip 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Flemington 103.
Lewis acid-base chemistry and applications to transition metals will be discussed. Concepts covered will include structure and bonding, ligand field theory, magnetism and electronics. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: CHEM 3311) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Flemington 116.
This course surveys the political and social history of ancient Greece and Rome with a focus on the themes of Law, Politics, War, and Society. It pays particular attention to Athens in the fifth and fourth centuries B.C.E. and to Rome under Caesar Augustus. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with HIST 1631 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Distribution: Humanities-b) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Sir James Dunn Building 113.
An examination of the development of Rome from a small city-state into the leading power in the Mediterranean. Main themes include the conflict between Rome and Carthage, the conquest of the Hellenistic East, and the political and social changes in Roman society. There will be an emphasis on the analysis and interpretation of primary sources in translation. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with HIST 3021 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon G12.
This course presents an intensive survey of English literary history from Anglo-Saxon times to the late eighteenth century as well as training in the research methods of the discipline. [Note 1: ENGL 2201 is mandatory for the Majors and Honours degrees.](Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 2001) Monday and Wednesday 3:00 to 4:20PM Barclay 021.
This course examines British writing from the Age of Reason to the Age of Sensibility (1720-1780). The range of genres and authors to be studied includes satires by Pope and Johnson, novels by Haywood, Fielding, Sterne, and Burney, lyric odes by Carter, Collins, and Gray, and the first Gothic novel by Walpole. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 3400) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Crabtree M10.
This course examines British writing from the 1830s to the 1860s. Genres and authors to be studied include the novels, essays, and poems of such authors as Carlyle, the Brontes, Tennyson, Gaskell, Dickens, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and Robert Browning. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 3450) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Crabtree M10.
This course presents a critical examination of current research techniques. Students design, implement, complete and evaluate a field research project in Human Geography and Environment. [Note 1: This course requires attendance at an off-campus field camp and students must cover some field trip costs.](Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Multi-Day Field Camp)(Exclusion: GEOG 3701) Monday 7:00 to 9:50PM Avard Dixon G9.
This course addresses the importance of place in the development of human interactions with the environment. It examines the principles of place geography, including ecological and bioregional perspectives on the Sackville and Tantramar region; place-conscious learning and sustainability; place-making and local geographies; and the local community as a place for experiential learning. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)(Exclusion: GENV 2991 Place Matters; GENV 4951 Place Geography) Wednesday 2:30 to 5:20PM Avard Dixon G12.
This course explores geographic and environmental education encompassing formal, informal, and traditional ideas and practices and the ways in which these may be integrated in planning for a sustainable society. It takes a critical approach to environmental education with an emphasis on developing and practicing sustainable perspectives on how people learn about, think about, and manage their affairs within the natural environment. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: GENV 4951 Environmental Education; GENV 4951 Geographical and Environmental Education; GENV 4951 Geographical Education; GENV 4951 Sustainable Education) Friday 8:30 to 11:20AM
This course introduces students to the reading of unadapted passages from ancient authors. While the emphasis is on developing a fluency in reading Latin, it also reviews basic Latin grammar and presents some more advanced grammar and syntax. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to 9:20AM Hart Hall 407.
This course provides techniques and software tools that assist in the use of computers to enhance work in science. It introduces basic methodology for data manipulation such as error analysis, statistical analysis of data, linear regression, graphing, aspects of simulation, digitization, interfacing and data acquisition. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Sir James Dunn Building 308.