This course investigates religious moral thought through the lens of nature and environmental issues. It explores various religious perspectives, both Asian and Western, on topics such as the meaning of nature and the place of humans in it, the value of landscapes and ecosystems, whether animals have moral standing and how they should be treated, and how current environmental problems should be understood and approached. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 2:30 to 3:50PM Crabtree 223.
A study of Hinduism, examining its origins, history, philosophy, and culture. The course will treat ancient, classical, medieval and modern periods, and conclude with a discussion of the challenges facing contemporary Hinduism. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: RELG 3261) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Crabtree M10.
This course examines sexual attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors from a sociological perspective, exploring how the biology of sex is sociologically constructed. It examines and explores theoretical and conceptual issues and empirical research and directs students to think about sexuality analytically and critically and to develop a sociological understanding of diverse issues. Topics include: sexual identity and its construction and regulation; sexuality and the Enlightenment; science and sex; ethics and social institutions; and the relationship between sexuality and the socio-political process. [Note 1: This course is normally offered only through Correspondence.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: SOCI 2991 Sociology of Sex and Sexuality) Tuesday 6:00 to 8:50PM Avard Dixon 118.
This course is a survey of the dynamics of Aboriginal life in Canada linking its rich and varied past with the challenges of the present. It follows the development of Aboriginal societies in Canada drawing on archaeological, linguistic and ethnographic data to reveal a complex picture of regional cultural diversity. Attention is given to contemporary issues of rights, economic development, and governance. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ANTH 2801) Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 to 2:20PM Avard Dixon 116.
This course introduces students to the central elements in anthropological field research methods, past and present. Topics covered include: research goals and project design; participant-observation and related techniques for acquiring original data; practical and ethical considerations regarding the field experience. (Format: Lecture/Case Studies 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Crabtree M2.
This course introduces current topics and advances in Biochemistry and engages students in the scope and activities of the discipline. It examines the central role of water in biological systems, leading to an introduction of acid-base equilibria, the properties of biological membranes, and the bioenergetics of solutes moving across membranes. It introduces the principles of carbon bonding and electronegativity, leading to coverage of the bioorganic functional groups, whose characteristic properties and reactions combine to create the highly complex biological macromolecule classes of carbohydrates, proteins,nucleic acids, and lipids. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1.5 Hours) (Distribution: Natural Science-b) Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 to 9:50AM Crabtree M14.
This course examines the properties of enzymes including kinetics and regulation. It introduces carbohydrate and fat metabolism, respiratory and photosynthetic electron transport, and nitrogen assimilation and dissimilation, concentrating on key stoichiometries, structures, redox biochemistry, and bioenergetics. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of BIOC 2001 previously offered with a different title) Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 to 9:50AM Flemington 116.
This course teaches students to plan and conduct a range of current biochemical analyses including spectroscopy, gas analyses, and chromatographic separations and imaging, with particular emphasis on the new opportunities opened through high-throughput computerized data capture applied to both established and new instrumental analyses. In parallel it guides students through the processes of plotting, interpreting, and presenting the meaning of their results. (Format: Integrated Lecture and Laboratory, 6 Hours) Monday 12:30 to 5:20PM Barclay 201.
This is a seminar course for Honours students in Biochemistry, which critically evaluates a wide range of topics from the current literature. Students are expected to deliver seminars on topics outside their thesis areas and to present preliminary thesis results. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Ralph Pickard Bell Library 316.
This course introduces the fundamentals of organismal biology: the scientific method, principles of evolution including Darwins theory of natural selection, adaptations in organismal form and function, biodiversity, the interactions of organisms with their environment, and the practices of scientific communication. [Note 1: This course is designed for science majors. Students who intend to continue to study in Biology should note the need to complete BIOC 1001 as a prerequisite for BIOL 1501.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of BIOL 1001 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 1:30 to 2:20PM Flemington 116.
This course introduces the structure, organization and functions of the cell, which is the fundamental structural and functional unit of living organisms. It places particular emphasis on eukaryotic cells. Topics include: membranes and organelles, communication within and between cells, membrane transport, the cell cycle, meiosis and mitosis. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Sir James Dunn Building 113.
This course introduces students to the structure and function of major groups of invertebrate and vertebrate animals on a comparative basis by observation of both preserved and living material. Topics include comparative anatomy and phylogeny, and the evolution and function of locomotory, digestive, excretory, respiratory, nervous and reproductive systems.(Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of BIOL 2401 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Barclay 02.
This course examines evolution by natural selection as the driving force behind the diversity of life, examining genetic and evolutionary processes from the level of cells (gene transcription, recombination, mutation) to populations (selection, migration, genetic drift) to species (speciation, extinction, constraint). It examines modern theories of biological evolution, building from Mendelian genetics to genomics, and presents evolutionary biology as an experimental science, emphasizing the methods used to test evolutionary hypotheses in the wild and in the lab. It uses viruses, bacteria, and eukaryotes of various levels of complexity as examples both in lectures and laboratories. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: 6 credits from BIOL 2601 and BIOL 2801) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Flemington 116.
This course covers the ecophysiology of microorganisms. The course surveys the key functional microbial groups which mediate major steps in the biogeochemical cycles, their ecological requirements and factors limiting their growth and activity. This leads to discussion of the roles of microorganisms in current issues in biology, industry and environmental science. (Format: Integrated Lecture and Laboratory 6 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of BIOL 3111 previously offered with a different title) Tuesday and Thursday 4:00 to 5:20PM Flemington 024.
This course investigates the interactions between plants and human societies from the introduction of agriculture until the present. It includes the consideration of the evolution of vascular plants, especially those important to agriculture and forestry. It emphasizes the origins of agriculture on various continents and discusses economic botany and the present day commercial uses of plants. It also considers interrelations between plants and societies in dietary, cultural and religious connotations. Finally, the course considers world food shortages, either present or potential, and possible ways to alleviate these. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to 9:20AM Flemington 103.
This course investigates how to design studies with clear hypotheses, select appropriate statistical methods, and carry out the analyses, applying the techniques to real data sets. It reviews a variety of statistical techniques including advanced ANOVA and regression, techniques for categorical data, resampling methods, MANOVA, and other multivariate techniques. It also considers experimental design issues such as power analysis and pseudoreplication. [Note: Throughout the course, data analyses are conducted using R.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 2 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Hart Hall 218.
This course examines the structure, bonding, and reactivity of organotransition metal complexes. Topics include: the 18-electron rule, the isolobal analogy, catalysis, and the role metals play in organic synthesis. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: CHEM 3331) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Ralph Pickard Bell Library 316.
This course examines the career of Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic era that followed his conquest of the eastern Mediterranean. The main themes include the goals of Alexander, the new political climate of kingship and patronage that he helped create, the interaction of the Greeks with the civilizations of Egypt and the East, and the integration of new cultural ideas into Greek society. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with HIST 2021 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Distribution: Humanities-b)(Exclusion: CLAS/HIST 3011) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Barclay 02.
An examination of the history of imperial Rome from the age of Augustus to that of Constantine. Main themes include the imperial form of government, the Roman army, urban development and its impact on society, and the conflicts between Romans and other cultures. There will be an emphasis on the analysis and interpretation of primary sources in translation. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with HIST 3031 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon 118.
The course examines social, psychological, situational, and economic influences on the consumer decision-making process of individuals and families. It emphasizes new product adoption, marketing communications, and consumer research applications. (Format: Lecture/Application 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Sir James Dunn Building 106.
Advanced structures for data organization, with an emphasis on associated algorithms and their complexity. Topics include: binary and text file structures, compression, distributed computing, event-driven programming, advanced user interface design. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Sir James Dunn Building 104.
This course introduces the principles and tools of interactive computer graphics: implementation of device drivers, 3D transformations, clipping, perspective views, input routines, user interface design, data structures, hidden lines, surface removal, colour shading and ray tracing. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 1:30 to 2:20PM Crabtree M2.
This course introduces the interrelationship between literature and social issues, focusing on the intersection of the discipline of English with other fields in the Arts and Humanities. It examines many of the major forms of English literature as encountered through discussions related to subjects such as the fine arts, religion, philosophy, history, and other fields in the Arts and Humanities. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorials Time Arranged) (Distribution: Arts-a) Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 to 2:20PM Sir James Dunn Building 113.
This course examines British writing at the zenith of the British Empire (1867-1900). The variety of genres and authors to be studied includes novels by Eliot, Thackeray and Hardy, essays by Arnold, Ruskin, and Pater, and poems by Webster, Field, Arnold, Hopkins, the pre-Raphealites, Christina Rossetti, and Wilde. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 3450) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Avard Dixon 112.
This course continues the studies begun in French 2401 and FREN 2501 by further developing skills in reading and interpretation of literary and cultural texts. It provides an introduction to textual analysis through selected critical approaches. [Note 1: Students planning to minor or major in French are encouraged to take FREN 2501 and FREN 2601 concurrently. When FREN 2501 and 2601 are taken concurrently, a C- in both courses is required for entry into 3000-level French literature and culture courses.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to 9:20AM Crabtree 202.
Writing practice and composition; the idiomatic use of French in a variety of contexts: informal prose, expository writing, technical language, literary language. Vocabulary and style exercises. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Crabtree 223.
This course studies the main currents in French Canadian and Qubcois literature (fiction, theatre, and poetry) from the nineteenth century to the 1970s. It places special emphasis on the literary changes which occur during the Quiet Revolution. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: FREN 3711; FREN 3771) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon 112.
This course introduces the study of the human population and the spatial dimensions of environmental change. It examines how people interact with the environment and the core forces which shape these interactions, including population, culture, technology, and geography. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Distribution: Social World-c) (Exclusion: GEOG 1201) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Sir James Dunn Building 113.
This course examines land use patterns as well as the environmental, social, economic and political structures of Canadian rural areas and small towns. It uses an integrated approach to resolving rural and small town development issues. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: GEOG 3511) Tuesday and Thursday 2:30 to 3:50PM Avard Dixon G12.
This course focuses on the emergence and legacy of communism in modern China, especially the legacy of Mao Zedong and his 50-year experiment in permanent revolution. With this in mind, we will also examine the degree to which Chinese-style communism represents a distinct change from previous forms of governance and social relationships. However, this thematic approach to examining revolutionary China must, by necessity, include an appreciation of how a variety of historical actors understood their own past as a first step toward acting in the present. Our study of China’s recent past will therefore focus primarily on politics, culture, and economics, but always with an eye to understanding the complex and oft-times uncomfortable relationship between the Chinese people and their own history.
This course will use exchange as a common organizing theme. We will begin with a set of brief discussions about what makes us human and what distinguishes us from other animals. From there, we will explore different attitudes toward wealth, consumption, and luxury from a comparative perspective. The final part of the course will examine attitudinal changes in 18th century Europe and China and their impact on exchange and the emergence of the West. The central goal of this course is to provide students with a broader comparative understanding about how exchange in all its forms has shaped our modern world and the rules by which we interact with each other.
A continuation of the study of the Latin language. While adding new grammar, this course concentrates on reading comprehension and vocabulary building. Three class periods per week, plus a fourth hour to be arranged after classes have begun. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1 Hour) (Exclusion: LATI 1000) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Avard Dixon 111.
This algebra-based course introduces and describes from a Physics perspective the many physical processes involving living organisms. Topics include biomechanics, kinesiology, energy and the body, fluid flow, electrical signaling, electrocardiography and electroencephalography, sound and hearing, light and vision, microscopy, and imaging of brain function. [Note 1: This course is designed for students planning to major in a life science.] (Format: Integrated Lecture/Collaborative Learning/Laboratory 6 Hours) (Distribution: Natural Science a/c) (Exclusion: PHYS 1051; PHYS 3521) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 1:20PM Sir James Dunn Building 308.
This course considers the two major revolutionary ideas of modern physics, quantum mechanics and special relativity. It considers Lorentz transformations, length contraction and time dilation, relativistic mass and momentum, including the fourvector relativistic notation. It also examines evidence for quantization along with early models for atoms and discusses De Broglies hypothesis for the matter wave. Other topics include the Schrodinger equation and its solutions for some usual systems. The course ends with a look at the three dimensional systems and a discussion of angular momentum in quantum mechanics. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of PHYS 3811 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Sir James Dunn Building 406.
This course explores sociocultural and political aspects of disability while paying particular attention to the ways in which disability intersects with other aspects of social life such as race, religion, sexuality, socioeconomic status, age, and gender. It explores key theoretical and methodological approaches used in the sociological study of disability and examines federal and international policy debates that address the rights and needs of people with disabilities. Course topics include: the medical model of disability, the social model of disability, feminist theories of disability, neurodiversity, activism, ableism, employment, race, eugenics, disability culture, gender, sexuality, and the representation of disability in media and popular culture. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: SOCI 2991 Sociology of Disability) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Avard Dixon G10.

This course provides an overview of concepts, theoretical issues, and debates in recent sociological theory. It examines the nature of functionalism and conflict theory, the rise of micro-sociological analysis, the challenges of feminism, the debate over post-modernism, and other contemporary theoretical developments.

This is an advanced research course on the media-based control of information and dissemination of ideologies in modern society. It examines issues of ownership and control of the media and the social construction of news, and current theoretical debates in media analysis.