This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for RELG 1991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable) Monday and Wednesday 1:30 to 2:50PM Barclay 021.
This course examines physical and chemical applications of kinetics, including those related to reaction mechanisms and dynamics. Specific topics include: experimental methods in kinetics; introduction to quantum mechanics needed to understand chemical kinetics; the potential energy surface (PES) for a chemical reaction and the effects of different features of the PES on the rate of chemical reactions; the effects of zero point energy and quantum tunneling on reaction rates. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with PHYS 3231 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: CHEM 3221; any version of CHEM 3231 previously offered with a different title) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Crabtree M2.
This course applies analysis and design techniques to non-numeric algorithms that act on data structures. The design of efficient algorithms leads to in-depth investigations of computational complexity such as NP-hard problems. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 to 2:20PM Sir James Dunn Building 104.
A study of Buddhism, examining its origins, history, philosophy and cultures. The course will treat the three major strands of classical Buddhism, and conclude with an analysis of the growing phenomenon of Western Buddhism. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: RELG 3271) Tuesday and Thursday 2:30 to 3:50PM Hart Hall 218.
This course treats the theme of the spiritual quest in Asian religions. Surveying some of the major Asian religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shinto) it explores the nature of the highest state thought to be achievable by humans and how that state is realized. Topics may include the role of morality, love, and human relationships in that quest, the place of rituals and institutions, and the vision for society. This course looks at both classical and contemporary views on these issues and situates them within their relevant socio-historical context. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Distribution: Humanities-a) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Barclay 02.
This course covers a broad range of aviation subjects and has a balance between individual and team assignments.

Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for COMM 4991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] Wednesday 5:30 to 8:20PM Avard Dixon 230.
This course introduces current topics and advances in Biochemistry and engages students in the scope and activities of the discipline. It examines the central role of water in biological systems, leading to an introduction of acid-base equilibria, the properties of biological membranes, and the bioenergetics of solutes moving across membranes. It introduces the principles of carbon bonding and electronegativity, leading to coverage of the bioorganic functional groups, whose characteristic properties and reactions combine to create the highly complex biological macromolecule classes of carbohydrates, proteins,nucleic acids, and lipids. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1.5 Hours) (Distribution: Natural Science-b) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Crabtree M14.
This course introduces current topics and advances in Biochemistry and engages students in the scope and activities of the discipline. It examines the central role of water in biological systems, leading to an introduction of acid-base equilibria, the properties of biological membranes, and the bioenergetics of solutes moving across membranes. It introduces the principles of carbon bonding and electronegativity, leading to coverage of the bioorganic functional groups, whose characteristic properties and reactions combine to create the highly complex biological macromolecule classes of carbohydrates, proteins,nucleic acids, and lipids. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1.5 Hours) (Distribution: Natural Science-b) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Crabtree M14.
This course deals with the biochemistry of interactions between animals, plants and microorganisms that occur in the natural environment. It places strong emphasis on the role of so-called secondary metabolites or natural products such as alkaloids, flavonoids, terpenoids, etc., in the insect-plant, vertebrate-plant, plant-plant and vertebrate-vertebrate relationships. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours) [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with BIOC 3711 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.] Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Flemington 103.
This course introduces the fundamental features of animal, bacterial, and plant viruses. It covers the biochemical genetic features of viral structure and replication, techniques used in studying viruses, the evolution of viruses, cell defence against viruses, the history of viruses as the causal agents of animal and plant disease, and current antiviral strategies. It also discusses the role of viruses as agents of evolutionary change, and their use in modern molecular genetics. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with BIOC 4151 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 to 9:50AM Hart Hall 218.
This course investigates how to design studies with clear hypotheses, select appropriate statistical methods, and carry out the analyses, applying the techniques to real data sets. It reviews a variety of statistical techniques including advanced ANOVA and regression, techniques for categorical data, resampling methods, MANOVA, and other multivariate techniques. It also considers experimental design issues such as power analysis and pseudoreplication. [Note: Throughout the course, data analyses are conducted using R.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 2 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Hart Hall 218.
This course surveys the political and social history of ancient Greece and Rome with a focus on the themes of Law, Politics, War, and Society. It pays particular attention to Athens in the fifth and fourth centuries B.C.E. and to Rome under Caesar Augustus. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with HIST 1631 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Distribution: Humanities-b) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Crabtree M14.
Employing both material and literary evidence, this course surveys the conditions of life and common ailments and treatments of the inhabitants of the Greek and Roman world from ca. 1000 B.C.E. to ca. 500 C.E.. It also examines the origins of Western medicine in Greek and Roman science, alongside its alternatives, such as magic. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with HIST 3051 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Barclay 021.
The course examines social, psychological, situational, and economic influences on the consumer decision-making process of individuals and families. It emphasizes new product adoption, marketing communications, and consumer research applications. (Format: Lecture/Application 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon 112.
This course examines the appropriate application of marketing management concepts and frameworks to arts and culture. Students gain familiarity with research issues and experience in identifying and resolving marketing problems in the arts and culture sector. [Note 1: Bachelor of Fine Arts or Bachelor of Music students already doing 3/4000 level work in their own field will be admitted to this course.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: COMM 4241 if taken in Winter 2005 or Fall 2006) Tuesday 1:30 to 4:20PM Avard Dixon 120.
This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for GENS 3991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable) Friday 8:30 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon 116.
This course examines community responses to the necessity and challenge of growth. Discussion focuses on the contributions of planning to the process of development and to the outcomes and opportunities which parallel this process. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: GEOG 3531) Monday 7:00 to 9:50PM CLASSES WILL BE HELD IN THE LEARNING LAB, Room #115, HART HALL, as well as some meetings off campus through-out the term.
This course considers fundamental concepts of ionizing radiation, diagnostic applications of medical physics, and therapeutic applications of medical physics. Diagnostic topics include x-rays, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and nuclear medicine. Therapeutic topics include radiation generators, absorbed dose calculations, dose measurement, and brachytherapy. [Note 1: This course is intended both for physics students who are considering a career in medical physics or in the field of medicine, and for students in other programs with similar interests.] (Format: Integrated Lecture and Laboratory 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to 9:20AM Sir James Dunn Building 308.
This course is a study of the political process in Canada. It presents an overview of the constitution, institutions, and political actors that represent the essential components of Canadas political culture and government. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Barclay 02.
This course introduces the basic concepts of sociology including social structure, culture, socialization, deviance, social control, social organization, structured social inequality, and social change. It makes extensive use of examples from the Canadian context. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Distribution: Social World) Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 to 2:20PM Crabtree M14.

This course introduces the basic concepts of sociology including social structure, culture, socialization, deviance, social control, social organization, structured social inequality, and social change. It makes extensive use of examples from the Canadian context. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Distribution: Social World) Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 to 9:50AM Sir James Dunn Building 113.

This course investigates the processes and forms of contemporary popular culture. It introduces students to the major theoretical debates in the field of popular culture and examines the development of popular cultural expression. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Avard Dixon 111.