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This course is an interdisciplinary investigation of the consumer decision-making process of individuals and groups. It examines the role of information processing, situational influences, and the marketing environment in the selection, purchase, use, and disposal of products, services, ideas, and experiences. It considers emerging ethical and technological issues. (Format: Lecture/Application 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon 112.

Financial concepts and techniques applied to problems such as working capital management, financial planning, capital budgeting, capital structure, cost of capital, and mergers and acquisitions. [Note 1: Counts as an Economics elective for students taking a Major, Minor or Honours in Economics.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday and Wednesday 1:30 to 2:50PM Sir James Dunn Building 406.
This course explores a range of issues in the aviation industry in which decision making has to balance strategic and tactical thinking against moral and ethical implications under constraints of time. [Note: This course is only available to students in the Bachelor of Commerce, BA Major in Commerce or BSc Major in Aviation] (Format: Lectures, case studies, field trips, 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Commerce 4991 Business of Aviation; Commerce 4991 Aviation Management) Wednesday 5:30 to 8:20PM Avard Dixon 112.
This course explores the relationship between leadership and key organizational issues and examines how the construct of leadership is enacted across organizations in the private, public, and not-for-profit sectors. It explores various theories of leadership, both classic and contemporary, as well as the evolution of leadership theory over time and its application in practice. Topics include: character, values, power and influence, gender and culture, organizational relationships, decision-making and problem solving, and management of organizational change. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours) (Exclusions: COMM 4991 Leadership; COMM 4991 Leadership in Organizations) Monday and Wednesday 3:00 to 4:20PM Crabtree 223.
This course integrates the concepts and techniques developed in prior Commerce courses through the analysis and discussion of case studies, current affairs and academic literature. It introduces the discipline and practice of strategic management and applies the concepts in a diverse range of organizational and industry settings. It encourages the development of an ability to view the organization as a whole through exploring the interdependencies between organizational functions and the environment. [Note 1: This course is open only to students in their last year of studies for a Bachelor of Commerce degree. It is not available to students enrolled in the Minor or Major in Commerce.] (Format: Lecture/Seminar 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of COMM 4311 previously offered with a different title) Tuesday 2:30 to 3:50PM Avard Dixon 118.
This course examines the sports marketing industry in relation to amateur sports, professional leagues, media, endorsements by athletes, corporate sponsorship, and the revenue streams associated with sport. It considers how effective marketing strategies can be created for sporting properties, and also how sport is used as a vehicle to market non-sport products. There is an emphasis on understanding and applying the conceptual and theoretical bases of sport marketing to actual sports organizations and their business strategies. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday and Wednesday 1:30 to 2:50PM Barclay 021.
This course provides an introduction to business combinations, consolidated financial statements, joint ventures, and accounting for transactions and operations conducted in foreign currencies. (Format: Lecture/Case studies 3 Hours) (Exclusion: any version of COMM 4131 previously offered with a different title) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Avard Dixon 111.
An introductory course in commercial law, providing background for general business. Topics dealt with are: the essentials of a contract, general contract law, sale of goods, employment and agency, business associations, credit transactions. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: COMM 4611) Tuesday 5:30 to 8:20PM Avard Dixon 118.
Important topics in this course include value, capital budgeting, the relationship of risk and expected return, market efficiency, capital structure and dividend policy. Other topics such as option theory, hedging, the theory of interest, and international finance may be introduced. The institutional setting of financial management in North America, and specifically in Canada, will be discussed. [Note 1: Counts as an Economics elective for students taking a Major, Minor or Honours in Economics.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday and Wednesday 1:30 to 2:50PM Avard Dixon 111.
This course examines formalized methods of arriving at business decisions. Topics may include constrained optimization models, decision models, game theory, network models, forecasting, and dynamic programming. [Note 1: Counts as an Economics elective for students taking a Major, Minor or Honours in Economics.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of COMM 3411 previously offered with a different title). Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Avard Dixon 111.
This course examines human resource management functions in formal organizations, both public and private. Topics include human resource planning, recruitment, selection, performance appraisal and employment equity; training and development; compensation systems and the management of employee benefits; and the role of the human resource manager. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 to 2:20PM Avard Dixon 112.
This course examines the appropriate application of marketing management concepts and frameworks to arts and culture. Students gain hands-on experience with issues related to the identification and resolution of marketing problems in the arts and culture sector. [Note 1: Students enrolled in Drama. Fine Arts, or Music programs who are already doing 3/4000 level work in their own field will be admitted to this course.] (Format: Seminar 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 2:30 to 3:50PM Purdy Crawford Centre 103.
Markets are becoming increasingly global. This course explores the managerial aspects of exporting and importing companies, multi-national firms, and small to large businesses serving global markets. (Format: Lecture/Case Study 3 Hours) Monday and Wednesday 3:00 to 4:20PM Avard Dixon 116.
This course introduces the role of auditing in society and the ethics and standards of professional conduct expected of auditors. It develops a conceptual understanding of key decisions made by auditors when examining and reporting on financial statements. It develops an appreciation of the complex environment in comprehensive or value-for-money audit on corporations and public institutions. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: COMM 4151) Monday and Wednesday 3:00 to 4:20PM Barclay 115.
The course will explore the basic principles of taxation in Canada, with emphasis on Canadian Income Tax. It stresses the effects of taxation on business decisions by individuals and corporations. (Format: Lecture/Problem Based Learning 3 Hours) (Exclusion: COMM 4111) Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 to 9:50AM Avard Dixon 111.
This course expands basic accounting concepts learned in Commerce 2101 and 2121. It develops the general accounting theory of assets, liabilities, income, equity, and funds flow. Particular emphasis will be placed on the conceptual framework of accounting, revenue and expense recognition, asset and liability recognition, and measurement and disclosure. (Format: Case Discussion/Lecture/Problem Based Learning 3 Hours.) Tuesday and Thursday 4:00 to 5:20PM Avard Dixon 118.
This course focuses on the micro aspects of organizational behaviour. It emphasizes human needs, motivation, perception, individual differences, personality, job design, work attitudes, performance appraisal, and stress management. The objective is to ensure that potential managers interact more effectively with subordinates, peers, and superiors in the organizational setting. (Format: Case/Discussion/Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon 118.
This course stresses the meaning of products and services to the consumer recognizing that a consumer orientation is essential for effective decision making. Students have the opportunity to develop fundamental skills in analysis, report writing, and presentations.(Format: Lecture/Discussion 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 to 2:20PM Barclay 021.
This course introduces the accounting model and analysis of Financial Statements and the important concepts associated with them. (Format: Lecture/Problem Based Learning 3 Hours) (Exclusion: COMM 1111) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Avard Dixon 120.
This course introduces core elements and functions of businesses and organizations (herein, organizations) in contemporary society. It considers internal and external influences, pressures and demands on organizations to understand and critically reflect on the contexts in which they operate. It introduces different business and organizational structures, functions, and considers issues of competition and collaboration within and between businesses and stakeholder groups (including governments, sectors/industries, unions and the workforce). [Note: This course is intended for first year or second year students, or students with little prior knowledge in commerce and business studies]. This course may not count for credit toward a degree if credit has already been granted for nine or more credits from 2000 level Commerce courses] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday and Wednesday 1:30 to 2:50PM Crabtree M14.