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This course examines the major concepts underlying the design of operating systems such as process management, scheduling, memory management, device management, security, and network structures. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 to 2:20PM Sir James Dunn Building 106.
This course examines the historical development and growth of the computer and related digital technology. The impact of the computer and the digitalization of society are discussed, including ethical issues related to the modern information age. Privacy and data protection, computer crime, data theft, and legal issues in software creation and use are examined. The responsibilities of the computer professional and computer user are examined from the technical, personal, and societal perspectives. [Note 1: Counts as a Commerce elective for students taking a Bachelor of Commerce or a Major or Minor in Commerce.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Sir James Dunn Building 108.
This course introduces the major types of database systems and provides experience with at least one database model. It emphasizes the theoretical and practical aspects of the relational model, including database query systems and database design. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 4:00 to 5:20PM Sir James Dunn Building 104.
This course introduces students to both digital electronic circuits and digital signal processing, and would be valuable both for those planning to go on in technical careers in computer science or in physics, and for scientists who wish to develop tools for the collection and analysis of data. Topics to be covered include digital logic gates, Boolean algebra, counting circuits, digital signal conditioning, sampling considerations such as the Nyquist criterion, analog to digital and digital to analog conversion, Fourier Transform theory and application as FFT, correlation and convolution, digital filtering using finite impulse response and infinite impulse response circuits including the ztransform and filter design, and digital image processing including two dimensional FFT techniques, microprocessors, microcontrollers and digital signal processing integrated circuits. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with PHYS 3361 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Sir James Dunn Building 104.
This course introduces effective methods of data organization, focussing on data structures and their algorithms via abstract data types with the use of recursive procedures. It explores the design of flexible file structures and related methods such as indexes, system file structures, and hashed access, and it emphasizes object-oriented programming techniques.(Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 to 2:20PM Barclay 115.
This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for COMP 1991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable) Tuesday and Thursday 4:00 to 5:20PM Sir James Dunn Building 108.
This course provides a broad survey of computer science and an introduction to programming. Topics include: origins of computers, data representation and storage, Boolean algebra, digital logic gates, computer architecture, assemblers and compilers, operating systems, networks and the Internet, theories of computation, and artificial intelligence. [Note 1: University preparatory level course in Mathematics is required.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Distribution: Natural Science-a)(Exclusion: COMP 1611; COMP 1711; any COMP course at the 2000 level or higher) Tuesday and Thursday 4:00 to 5:50PM Avard Dixon G10.
This course provides a broad survey of computer science and an introduction to programming. Topics include: origins of computers, data representation and storage, Boolean algebra, digital logic gates, computer architecture, assemblers and compilers, operating systems, networks and the Internet, theories of computation, and artificial intelligence. [Note 1: University preparatory level course in Mathematics is required.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Distribution: Natural Science-a) (Exclusion: COMP 1611; COMP 1711; any COMP course at the 2000 level or higher) Monday and Wednesday 4:30 to 6:20PM, or Tuesday and Thursday 4:00 to 5:50 Avard Dixon G10