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This course presents an introductory overview of Canadian literature from its beginnings to the present. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 2800) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Hart Hall 319.

This course examines closely selected topics drawn from American English literature. [Note 1: ENGL 4701 may be taken for credit more than once if the topic differs] (Format: Seminar 3 Hours) Monday 3:00 to 5:50PM Crabtree 202.
This course offers an introduction to various contemporary theories of literature; diverse approaches, such as structuralist, semiotic, post-structuralist and deconstructive will be examined. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 3880) Monday and Wednesday 1:30 to 2:50PM Hart Hall 218.
This full-year course offers workshops in creative writing, concentrating primarily on poetry and short fiction; it may also include some work in other forms such as drama and the personal essay. See the English Department website for the annual deadline for submitting application portfolios. (Format: Seminar/Workshop 3 Hours)(Exclusion: ENGL 3850; ENGL 3861) Friday 2:30 to 5:20PM Avard Dixon G10.
A study of literature by women before the twentieth century. This course employs a variety of critical approaches to define a tradition of writing by women. Works by such writers as Mary Godwin Shelley, Charlotte Bront, Christina Rossetti, and Elizabeth Barrett Browning will be examined. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 3650) Tuesday and Thursday 2:30 to 3:50PM Barclay 115.
This course examines British writing from the Age of Reason to the Age of Sensibility (1720-1780). The range of genres and authors to be studied includes satires by Pope and Johnson, novels by Haywood, Fielding, Sterne, and Burney, lyric odes by Carter, Collins, and Gray, and the first Gothic novel by Walpole. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 3400) Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 to 2:20PM Crabtree M10.
This course offers students an introductory survey of American writing from the colonial period to the present. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday and Wednesday 1:30 to 2:50PM Ralph Pickard Bell Library 316.
This course introduces students to a wide range of Shakespeares plays. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 2311; ENGL 2321; ENGL 3300) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Sir James Dunn Building 108.
This course presents an intensive survey of English literary history from Anglo-Saxon times to the late eighteenth century as well as training in the research methods of the discipline. [Note 1: ENGL 2201 is mandatory for the Majors and Honours degrees.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 2001) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Ralph Pickard Bell Library 316.
This course examines the two major prose genres of the novel and the short story; selected examples of representative forms introduce students to the range and variety of both genres. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Distribution: Arts-a) (Exclusion: ENGL 2031; ENGL 2041) Monday Wednesday and Friday 2:30 to 3:20PM Avard Dixon G12.
This course introduces conventions, forms, and devices of drama as they emerge under, and respond to, specific theatrical and cultural conditions. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as DRAM 1701 and may be taken as three credits in either discipline.](Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Distribution: Arts-a)(Exclusion: DRAM/ENGL 2021) Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 to 2:20PM Barclay 02.
This course, offered in several sections each year, introduces students to critical approaches to the reading of, and writing about, literature. Each section has its own reading list, set by the individual instructor and including a balanced representation of prose, fiction, poetry and drama, taken from a range of historical periods.[Note 1: Students who wish to pursue courses in English at the 2000 level and above must take ENGL 1201.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 1001) Monday Wednesday and Friday 1:30 to 2:20PM Flemington 103.
This course, offered in several sections each year, introduces students to critical approaches to the reading of, and writing about, literature. Each section has its own reading list, set by the individual instructor and including a balanced representation of prose, fiction, poetry and drama, taken from a range of historical periods.[Note 1: Students who wish to pursue courses in English at the 2000 level and above must take ENGL 1201.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 1001) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon 111.
This course, offered in several sections each year, introduces students to critical approaches to the reading of, and writing about, literature. Each section has its own reading list, set by the individual instructor and including a balanced representation of prose, fiction, poetry and drama, taken from a range of historical periods.[Note 1: Students who wish to pursue courses in English at the 2000 level and above must take ENGL 1201.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ENGL 1001) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon 112.