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This course considers themes in health and disease in the Early Modern Atlantic World from a comparative British, French, and Spanish perspective. Topics covered include: understandings of health and disease, medical treatments, epidemic and endemic diseases (yellow fever, malaria, typhus, smallpox, syphilis) and their effects on the development of the early modern imperialism, warfare, slavery, and colonisation.
This senior seminar explores some of the profound social, cultural, political and economic changes that transformed European life during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Topics vary from year to year. (Format: Seminar 3 Hour) Monday 2:30 to 5:20PM Crabtree M3.
This course examines European history, ca. 1100 to ca. 1500. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 4110) Wednesday 2:30 to 5:20PM Crabtree M3.
This course focuses on everyday working-class resistance manifested through labour organizations and political movements. (Format: Lecture/Tutorial 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 to 2:20PM Hart Hall 218.
This course explores theoretical approaches to womens history through an examination of the role and experience of women in the United States from the Revolution to the present. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Avard Dixon 112.
This course examines the history of North America and the Caribbean from the fifteenth century to the American Revolution within the wider context of the Atlantic world. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: HIST 3550; any version of HIST 3511 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Hart Hall 218.

Topics include: cultural, social, and gender history, European migration, slavery, colonial-Indigenous relations, war, and plantation and resource extraction economic development.
This course traces the development of political movements and ideas that are an integral part of the texture of modern Canada and that have been shaping influences on the direction and pace of social, intellectual, and economic life. (Format: Lecture/Tutorial 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Barclay 217.
This course traces the decline of the aristocracy, the triumph of the middle classes, and the making of the working class in Britain during the early stages of capitalism and industrialization. The course also examines gender relations and analyses the notion of separate spheres. It pays particular attention to the controversies among historians surrounding the nature of social transformation in Britain. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 3400; any version of HIST 3251 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Crabtree M10.
This course treats the remarkable cultural flowering that began during the mid-thirteenth century in the politically and socially volatile city-states of northern Italy before spreading during the fifteenth century to the courts, city halls, print-shops, monasteries, and schools of northern Europe. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 3110; any version of HIST 3121 previously offered with a different title) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Hart Hall 101.
This course introduces students to the main events, themes and issues of American history from the colonial period through the Civil War. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Distribution: Humanities-b) (Exclusion: HIST 2510, 3650) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Sir James Dunn Building 106.
This course introduces students to the political, socio-economic, and cultural history of Canada from the pre-European period to the first federal census. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Distribution: Humanities-b) (Exclusion: HIST 2410, 3100, 3250) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Barclay 021.

Topics include: cultural, social, and gender history, European migration, slavery, colonial-Indigenous relations, war, political change, technological development, Maritime Union, and Confederation.
Using written and material evidence, this course will explore the economic, social and political roles of women in the societies of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as the development of the Western idea of the female in antiquity. Secondarily, it will introduce and explore the social theories commonly applied to the study of gender in history. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as CLAS 2051 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 1:30 to 2:20PM Flemington 116.
This course surveys the history of Early Modern Europe between 1500 and 1800. It examines the social, cultural, economic, and political developments from the period of the Reformation to the Napoleonic era. Themes include: religious conflict, rural life, capital accumulation, the Enlightenment, absolutism, imperial expansion, war, and revolution. It emphasizes the study of history through an introduction to the methods, theories, and concepts that historians use to represent and interpret the past. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Distribution: Humanities-b) (Exclusion: HIST 2010, HIST 2500) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon G12.
This course examines the social, cultural, economic, and political forces that combined to produce the French Revolution placing particular emphasis on use of primary sources for reconstructing revolutionary experience. Themes include: society in the ancien rgime, the Enlightenment, revolutionary political experimentation, war,women and revolution, and the Terror. (Format: Lecture/Tutorial 3 Hours) (Distribution: Humanities-b) (Exclusion: HIST 3371) Monday Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to 9:20AM Flemington 116.
This course focuses on the expansion of Europe after the fifteenth century and the impact of that expansion on both Native peoples and on European civilization. Themes include the creation of a world economy, racial relations, the rise and fall of European power, the impact of technology, the growth of indigenous nationalism,and the legacy of European expansion. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Distribution: Humanities-b) Monday Wednesday and Friday 1:30 to 2:20PM Avard Dixon G12.