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This course is an overview of social, cognitive, and biological development during early, middle, and especially late adulthood. Topics include:  age-related changes in the central nervous system; dementia; late-life changes in intellectual abilities, memory and sensory processes; and the effects of age on personality and interpersonal relationships.

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for PSYC 4991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable) Wednesday 1:30 to 4:20PM Bennett Building G03.
This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. [Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for PSYC 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Independent Study)
This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. [Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for PSYC 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Independent Study)
A seminar for honours students in Psychology that will involve consideration of metatheoretical, psychometric, and ethical issues that inevitably arise in the course of virtually any type of psychological inquiry. In addition to the critical evaluation of classic articles on these topics, students will make periodic presentations of their own ongoing research, which will be open to all members of the Department. (Format: Seminar 2 Hours) Thursday 1:00 to 2:50PM Crabtree 202.
This research seminar in psychoneuroimmunology examines how interactions among behaviour, the nervous system, and the immune system influence health. The broad focus is on relationships among brain, behaviour, and immunity from a life-span perspective and on the implications for disease management within various areas of behavioural medicine.(Format: Seminar 3 Hours) (Exclusion: PSYC 4501 Advanced Topics in Health Psychology) Monday 1:30 to 4:20PM Sir James Dunn Building 104.
This course presents an in-depth examination of theory and research pertinent to a topic of current interest in the field of Psychopathology. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Sir James Dunn Building 104.
This course presents an overview of sport psychology within the framework of psychological science. Sports psychology involves the study of psychological variables that impact participation and performance in athletics; this study incorporates theories and research from many areas of psychology, including personality, social, cognitive, and clinical. In this course, relevant theories and research will be reviewed and applied to the context of performance in sport and participation in physical activity as well as to coaching. Course content will bridge theory and empirical study with practical applications to health and sport.

Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon G12.
This course examines psychological perspectives on issues related to death, dying, and bereavement. Topics include hospice palliative care, end-of-life decisions, suicide, euthanasia, funeral practices, dealing with grief and bereavement, and cross-cultural perspectives on and attitudes toward death and dying. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 to 2:20PM Ralph Pickard Bell Library 316.
This course examines human sexuality from a multidisciplinary perspective. Topics include physiology and anatomy, sexual behavior, sexual orientation, reproduction, sexual health, and sexual problems and solutions. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to 9:20AM Avard Dixon G12.
This course examines the role of associative processes in both human and non-human learning. Topics include: habituation, classical conditioning, operant conditioning, and observational learning. [Note 1: PSYC 2001 and 2011 strongly recommended as additional prerequisites.] (Exclusion: PSYC 3011 Conditioning) (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Crabtree 223.
This course provides advanced analytic and design tools necessary to interpret the research of others and to conduct original research. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Crabtree 223.
This course presents an overview of psychological disorders: biological and social origins, classification, symptoms, and common treatments. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: PSYC 3061) Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 to 9:50AM Sir James Dunn Building 113.
This course provides an overview of mental processes and activities used in perceiving, learning, remembering, thinking, and understanding. It offers an opportunity to explore current information processing models and their applications. Topics include: attention, memory, language, neurocognition, and thinking and reasoning. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1 Hour) (Exclusion: PSYC 3021 Cognition) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Flemington 116.
This course introduces the neural bases of behaviour. Topics include: the role of evolution and genetics in the development of the nervous system, the structure and function of the nervous system, and the biological bases of perception, movement, eating, drinking, sleeping and dreaming, sexual behaviour, addiction and reward, and memory. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1 Hour) (Exclusion: PSYC 2051) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Barclay 02.
This course considers a range of research strategies, including descriptive, correlational, experimental, and quasi-experimental research designs. Other topics include: the research process, ethics in research, defining and measuring variables, sampling, and writing a research report. This course teaches the process of using descriptive statistics to evaluate the results of carefully planned research (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1 Hour) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Flemington 116.
This course introduces the concepts, problems, and methods of modern scientific psychology. Topics include: attitudes, stereotyping and other aspects of social psychology, developmental psychology, intelligence, aspects of cognition and language, personality, and the psychology of abnormal behaviour. [Note: PSYC 1001 and 1011 may be taken in either order; neither is a prerequisite to the other. ](Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Crabtree M14.
This course introduces the concepts, problems, and methods of modern scientific psychology. Topics include neuroanatomy and other aspects of the biological bases of psychological processes, learning, motivation, sensation, perception, aspects of cognition, memory, and language. [Note: PSYC 1001 and 1011 may be taken in either order; neither is a prerequisite to the other.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Distribution: Natural Science-b) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Crabtree M14.