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Independent research and thesis writing under the direction of a member of the Department, for students in the Religious Studies Honours program. [Note 1: Permission of the Department is required.] (Format: Independent Study/Thesis)
Independent research and thesis writing under the direction of a member of the Department, for students in the Religious Studies Honours program. [Note 1: Permission of the Department is required.] (Format: Independent Study/Thesis)
This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. [Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for RELG 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Independent Study)
This course examines the nature of scripture and what (or who) gives it authority. Through study of the related phenomena of interpretation, sacredness, and canonicity in biblical traditions, this course addresses questions of the origins of sacred texts and how such texts establish and sustain the religious, cultural, and social lives of communities. It explores how and with what results culturally and historically diverse interpretive communities have made fresh appropriations of scriptural traditions through various strategies of interpretation. It also asks what is at stake in these deliberations, who benefits, and how power operates or shifts via the various ideological mechanisms that serve to authorize scripture. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of RELG 4821 previously offered with a different title) Monday 3:00 to 5:50PM Hart Hall 319.
This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for RELG 3991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable) Tuesday 2:30 to 5:20PM Avard Dixon 111.
This course investigates the role that various religions play in human interaction with the environment and explores how religions are responding or not responding to environmental problems. It examines various religious perspectives on nature and examines critically scholarship which applies religious perspectives to issues in environmental ethics. It also considers the religious basis of contemporary environmental thinkers and movements and examines the worldview assumptions and values that underlie so-called secular approaches to environmental issues.(Format: Seminar 3 Hours) Friday 8:30 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon 230.
This course begins with the scene in Genesis where humanity is created in the image of God. It considers the various ways in which the human experience and the quest for meaning have been described, analyzed, and explained from theological and philosophical perspectives. Topics include the possibility of knowing God, the nature of the relationship between the human and the divine, the logic of resurrection, and the possibility of hope and ultimate meaning. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Thursday 2:30 to 5:20PM Hart Hall 101.
This course will study the religious traditions of Japan, examining the underlying ideas and concepts of Shinto, including its relation to Shamanism, the nature and role of Kami, the role of purity and aesthetics, and its political functions. The introduction and adaptation of Buddhism and its relation to Shinto will be discussed, as will the modern day new religions which form such a vital part of contemporary Japanese religious practice. The influence and roles of Confucianism and Daoism will also be briefly covered. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Wednesday 4:30 to 7:20PM Avard Dixon G12.
This course discusses the literature of the New Testament, in English translation, in light of the historical and cultural conditions from which it emerged. It analyzes the New Testament both as a witness to Jesus and to Christian origins, and as a text which has exerted enormous creative power within human culture and history. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Distribution: Humanities-a) (Exclusion: RELG 2011) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Hart Hall 101.
This course examines the practices and beliefs associated with food in five East Asian religious traditions: Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, folk or popular religion, and Shinto. It introduces religious prescriptions and prohibitions related to food cultivation, storage, distribution, preparation, and consumption. Topics include connections between food practices and hierarchy and the roles that food plays in creating and sustaining relationships such as those between humans, living and dead, and non-humans. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: RELG 2991 Food Practices and East Asian Religions) Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 to 2:20PM Avard Dixon G10.
This course investigates religious moral thought through the lens of nature and environmental issues. It explores various religious perspectives, both Asian and Western, on topics such as the meaning of nature and the place of humans in it, the value of landscapes and ecosystems, whether animals have moral standing and how they should be treated, and how current environmental problems should be understood and approached. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday and Wednesday 1:30 to 2:50PM Crabtree M10.
This course examines various points at which religion and culture collide. It utilizes various media (film, music, fashion, literature) in order to interpret some of the complex relationships that form and maintain contemporary Western identity. Topics include cultural uses of religious symbolism and story, the power of popular piety, and the Western tendency towards consumption and commodification of religious traditions. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Distribution: Humanities-a) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Flemington 116.
This course examines the practices and beliefs concerning death and the afterlife in six religious traditions: Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, folk or popular religion, Shinto, and Hinduism. It compares beliefs and practices related to death and the afterlife in these traditions and examines the diversity that exists both between and within these religions. (Format: Lecture 3 hours) (Distribution: Humanities-a) (Exclusion: RELG 1991 Death and the Afterlife in Asian Religions) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Crabtree M14.