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This course examines the structural organization of the human body, including the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. It investigates these systems in the context of human health and disease. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion BIOL 3991 Human Anatomy) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50AM CTree M10.

This course investigates how to design studies with clear hypotheses, select appropriate statistical methods, and carry out the analyses, applying the techniques to real data sets. It reviews a variety of statistical techniques including advanced ANOVA and regression, techniques for categorical data, resampling methods, MANOVA, and other multivariate techniques. It also considers experimental design issues such as power analysis and pseudoreplication. [Note: Throughout the course, data analyses are conducted using R.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 2 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Flemington 103.
This course provides the opportunity for in-depth research of selected topics from the most current and progressive areas of marine science such as advances in biological, geological, chemical and physical oceanography and methodologies such as genomic approach to assessment of oceanic biodiversity and application of remote technology in marine exploration of the deep sea. The course emphasizes specific topics of global significance such as interactions between ocean and atmosphere, integrative and sustainable aquaculture, invasive biology, and marine pollution. (Format: Lecture 3 hours) (Exclusion: Any version of BIOL 4371 previously offered with a different title) Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 to 9:50AM Flemington 103.
This course investigates advanced topics in neurophysiology including neuro- and glio-transmission, the physiology and plasticity of synapses, and neuronal circuits that underlie behaviour. It also discusses the development and pathophysiology of the nervous system. (Format: Lecture/Seminar 3 Hours) (Exclusion: BIOL 4991 Special Topics in Neurophysiology) Monday Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to 9:20AM Avard Dixon 116.
This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for BIOL 3991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable) Monday Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to 9:20AM Flemington 103.
The field of conservation biology applies to the principles of ecology, biogeography, and population genetics to the mitigation of human impact and the maintenance of global biodiversity. The course will familiarize the student with the concepts and principles of conservation biology and will encourage active debate about threats to ecological integrity and the ways scientists attempt to cope with such threats. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 4:00 to 5:20PM Flemington 116.
This course explores how the genetic program of cells interacts with the external and organismal environment to product the phenotype of the organism. It explores our current understanding of how interactions between genes, gene identification, gene-environment interactions, gene regulation, and epigenetics allow normal development. Human, animal, and plant diseases provide examples of how these processes work and the consequences of disruption. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 1:30 to 2:20PM Flemington 103.
This course investigates in an evolutionary framework the variation in body plan, physiology, reproduction, and ecology for the more than thirty invertebrate phyla. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: BIOL 4511) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Flemington 103.
This course provides a comprehensive study of the physiology of the human body. It examines the function of the nervous, muscular, sensory, endocrine, respiratory, cardiovascular, and renal systems. [Note: Laboratory exercises with students as participants in experiments complement the course material and advance students knowledge of important physiological processes.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusions: Any version of BIOL 3201 offered prior to 2015-2016; Any version of BIOL 3211 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Flemington 103.
This course focuses on the physiological processes underpinning a monumental step in the evolution of the vertebrates, the transition from water to land. It examines the respiratory, circulatory, acid-base and osmoregulatory adaptations seen in fish to mammals and studies the integration of animal physiology with the environment by investigating metabolism and temperature. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Barclay 02.
This course explains the core molecular structures of the immune system: antibodies and their interactions with antigens. It places these molecular interactions in the context of the cells and tissues of the immune system and the signaling cascades that regulate immune responses. The course concludes with topics in immunology and applications of immunochemistry. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with BIOC 3051 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: BIOC 4011) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Barclay 021.
This course provides an overview of the major fossil plant and animal taxa in the context of the history of macroscopic and microscopic forms of life on Earth. It discusses morphology and anatomy of organisms in relation to accompanying changes in marine and terrestrial environments and when appropriate it emphasizes diagnostic features of the organisms used as time (biostratigraphy) and/or environmental (paleoecology) indicators. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: GENS 3991 Introduction to Palaeontology) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Flemington 103.
This course examines evolution by natural selection as the driving force behind the diversity of life, examining genetic and evolutionary processes from the level of cells (gene transcription, recombination, mutation) to populations (selection, migration, genetic drift) to species (speciation, extinction, constraint). It examines modern theories of biological evolution, building from Mendelian genetics to genomics, and presents evolutionary biology as an experimental science, emphasizing the methods used to test evolutionary hypotheses in the wild and in the lab. It uses viruses, bacteria, and eukaryotes of various levels of complexity as examples both in lectures and laboratories. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: 6 credits from BIOL 2601, 2801) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon G12.
This course introduces students to the structure and function of major groups of invertebrate and vertebrate animals on a comparative basis by observation of both preserved and living material. Topics include comparative anatomy and phylogeny, and the evolution and function of locomotory, digestive, excretory, respiratory, nervous and reproductive systems.(Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of BIOL 2401 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Avard Dixon G12.
This course surveys the evolutionary and functional diversity of the Archaea, Bacteria, and selected eukaryotic microbes, examining the cellular structures and metabolic processes characteristic of each group, and how these characteristics allow humans to control and use microbial growth. The course also examines how genomic sequencing is altering our views of microbial evolution and ecology. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: BIOL 3101) Monday Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to 9:20AM Barclay 02.
This course introduces the structure, organization and functions of the cell, which is the fundamental structural and functional unit of living organisms. It places particular emphasis on eukaryotic cells. Topics include: membranes and organelles, communication within and between cells, membrane transport, the cell cycle, meiosis and mitosis. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Sir James Dunn Building 113.