Help with Search courses
This course investigates chemical aspects of the environment and draws upon physical, organic, inorganic and analytical chemistry. It explores the natural chemical compositions of and anthropogenic effects on air, water and soil. Topics include ozone chemistry, smog, acid rain, global climate, DOM, metals, colloids, pE/pH, soil chemistry and wastes. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours,Tutorials 1.5 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM .
This course explores modern approaches to describing bonding in main group compounds with novel and unusual structures. Classes of compounds discussed include electron-deficient clusters, inorganic rings and polymers, and low coordinate main group centres. It also considers synthetic approaches, spectroscopic analysis, and industrial applications of these materials (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: CHEM 3361) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Crabtree M2.
This course examines the structure, bonding, and reactivity of organotransition metal complexes. Topics include: the 18-electron rule, the isolobal analogy, catalysis, and the role metals play in organic synthesis. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: CHEM 3331) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Sir James Dunn Building 106.
This course introduces the theoretical basis, scope and limitations of various instrumental methods of analysis, in the areas of Spectroscopy and Chromatography. Methods include GC/MS and HPLC for organic compounds, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) for metals and UV/VIS for both organic and inorganic compounds. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Barclay 115.
This course introduces common spectroscopic techniques in the context of structure elucidation. Frontier Molecular Orbital Theory, and the application of synthetic reactions to total synthesis. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any verson of CHEM 3111 previously offered with a different title) Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 to 9:50AM Barclay 217.
Lewis acid-base chemistry and applications to transition metals will be discussed. Concepts covered will include structure and bonding, ligand field theory, magnetism and electronics. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: CHEM 3311) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Barclay 115.
This course introduces the fundamental principles of thermodynamics, including the laws of thermodynamics and their applications to ideal systems, mixtures, and chemical equilibria. It also examines the historical development of quantum theory and the postulates of quantum mechanics and how they apply to simple physical systems, such as particle in a box and harmonic oscillator. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours, Tutorials) (Exclusion: Any version of CHEM 2211 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Barclay 115.
This course further develops the concepts taught in CHEM 2111. New topics include 13C NMR, aromatic chemistry, reactions of amines, chemistry of the carbonyl group, carboxylic acid derivatives, dienes/polyenes, and UV spectroscopy. It emphasizes mechanisms, synthesis, and the biological equivalents of certain organic reactions such as NaBH4/NADH and phosphate esters. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Flemington 116.
This course builds on CHEM 1001 and presents chemical concepts that are required for a fundamental understanding of the physical and life sciences. It explores the quantitative aspects of matter and topics such as: gases, the laws of thermodynamics; Gibbs energy; chemical reaction rates and mechanism; chemical equilibria; qualitative and quantitative descriptions of acid-base chemistry, redox reactions, and electrochemistry. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours, regular tutorials) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Sir James Dunn Building 113.