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The course examines the roles played by uncertainty and asymmetric information in the allocation of resources. It also uses tools of probability theory to examine strategic interaction. Honours students who wish to pursue graduate studies in economics are strongly advised to take this course. [Note 1: Counts as a Commerce elective for students taking a Bachelor of Commerce or a Major or Minor in Commerce.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Crabtree M3.
This course introduces many of the models that form the foundation of modern macroeconomics, including growth, network, and search-and-matching models. The core organizing principle of the course is the concept of general equilibrium, emphasizing tools and techniques for deriving equilibrium properties of the models. [Note 1: Counts as a Commerce elective for students taking a Bachelor of Commerce or a Major or Minor in Commerce. Note 2: Although not required, the Economics Department recommends that students complete MATH 2111 and MATH 2221 prior to undertaking ECON 4801. Note 3: Honours students who wish to pursue graduate studies in economics are strongly advised to take this course.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of ECON 4811 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Avard Dixon 111.
This course examines the criteria for making judgments on economic performance. It introduces and evaluates notions of efficiency, fairness, and distributive justice in economic outcomes. Topics include the measurement of economic inequality and poverty, value judgments in cost-benefit analysis, consistent collective decision making, and effective means of income redistribution. [Note 1: Counts as a Commerce elective for students taking a Bachelor of Commerce or a Major or Minor in Commerce.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 to 2:20PM Avard Dixon 111.
This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for ECON 3991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable) Monday and Wednesday 3:00 to 4:20PM Avard Dixon 116.
This course introduces students in social science disciplines to survey research methods. This involves the complete survey development process, including the development and administration of a survey questionnaire, sample selection, statistical analysis, and collaboration with survey developers and parties interested in the survey administration. It also covers presentation techniques (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: ECON 4981 Data Analysis I; ECON 4981 Data Analysis II; ECON 4981 Data and Research) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Avard Dixon 115.
This course covers microeconomic aspects of the Canadian financial system. One main focus of the course is on financial instruments, the markets in which they are traded, and the economic role that these markets play. The other main focus is on Canadian financial institutions, the activities in which they engage, and the economic roles they play. [Note 1: Counts as a Commerce elective for students taking a Bachelor of Commerce or a Major or Minor in Commerce.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon 112.
This course introduces statistical tools for handling data generated in uncontrolled environments and the techniques involved in their use. Topics include estimation and inference of single- and multi-variable regression models, large sample techniques, dummy variables, heteroskedasticity, and an introduction to times series. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of ECON 2701 previously offered with a different title) Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 to 9:50AM Avard Dixon G10.
This course introduces analytical methods used by social scientists examining Canadian social and economic policy by studying issues that arise perennially. Topics may include: unemployment and government policy, Canada and the global economy, social security reform, regionalism, education policy, health policy, and inflation. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of ECON 2301 previously offered with a different title) Tuesday and Thursday 2:30 to 3:50PM Avard Dixon 116.
This course is a continuation of macroeconomic analysis in the context of the long-run. Topics include long-run consumption functions, investment and real business cycles, economic growth and productivity, and the monetary theories of the classical economists, Keynes, and Friedman. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday and Wednesday 1:30 to 2:50PM Barclay 021.
This course presents microeconomic theory and its applications relating to producer decisions. Topics include: the theory of production and cost; profit maximization and competitive supply; pricing with market power; monopoly and monopsony; monopolistic competition and oligopoly; game theory and strategic interactions; markets for inputs and income distribution; markets and asymmetric information; analysis of markets and effects of government policies; and the theory of the firm and team production. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: any version of ECON 2011 previously offered with a different title) Monday and Wednesday 4:30 to 5:50PM Barclay 021.
This course introduces the study of Economics and the nature of macroeconomic problems such as the determinants of the level of national income, employment, and the accompanying stabilization problems and policies. Topics also include money and banking, international trade, exchange rates, and the problems of inflation. [Note 1: Students should normally have completed a university preparatory level course in Mathematics.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1 Hour) (Distribution: Social World-c)(Exclusion: ECON 1000) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Sir James Dunn Building 113.
This course introduces the study of Economics and the nature of microeconomic problems including the behaviour of consumers and firms in different markets, and the results of their actions as manifested in production, costs, and prices, market efficiency, and market failure. [Note 1: Students should normally have completed a university preparatory level course in Mathematics.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1 Hour) (Distribution: Social World-c)(Exclusion: ECON 1000) Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 to 2:20PM Crabtree M14.