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This course examines the relationship between socially constructed gender relations and the nature and form of urban areas. Students consider how social and cultural categories and historical processes shape the production of urban space, and how we in turn are shaped by it. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: GEOG 4811) Wednesday 2:30 to 5:20PM Barclay 217.
This course applies community planning theory and techniques to an actual case developed in concert with a local community. Students clarify client objectives, develop a research and analysis program, conduct fieldwork, analyze data, prepare recommendations, and present results to the client. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)(Exclusion: GEOG 4521) Friday 2:30 to 5:20PM Avard Dixon G9.
This course explores the economic geography of resource industries with a focus on the role that large corporations play in shaping the fortunes of communities where they operate. Its conceptual themes include staples theory, industrial restructuring, the greening (or greenwashing) of economic activity, and the use and abuse of environmental science by corporate interests. These issues are grounded in examinations of regional resource sectors, including forestry and fishing, as well as international case studies. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours) Tuesday 2:30 to 5:20PM Barclay 021.
This course examines current thinking on the relationship between environment and development. Topics may include: sustainable development, rural land use change, tropical deforestation and forest management, indigenous environmental knowledge, and community-based conservation. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: GEOG 3101) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Avard Dixon 120.
This course introduces the central concepts in urban geography by considering the historical and contemporary role of cities in the global landscape. It also investigates the shifting attitudes towards city life and city dwellers from the Industrial Revolution to the present day with an emphasis on social issues in the post-industrial city. Throughout this examination it emphasizes the place and development of Canadian cities. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: GENV 3811) Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 to 2:20PM Barclay 115.
This course surveys the changing geography of the developing world. It examines the decline in traditional land systems and resource use, surveys current economic development strategies, and reviews the role of international aid and non-governmental organizations in these strategies. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: GEOG 2201) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Avard Dixon 118.
This course introduces key concepts and issues in natural resources management. It examines resource sectors of importance to the Canadian economy, including forestry, fisheries, wildlife, energy, mining, water, and agriculture. The course emphasizes understanding the varied influences that environmental, socio-economic, and political factors have on patterns of resource utilization and resource management decision-making. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: GEOG 2101) Monday Wednesday and Friday 1:30 to 2:20PM Flemington 116.
This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for GENS 4991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable) Thursday 2:30 to 5:20PM Crabtree M2.
This course builds on the key concepts from GENS 2441 by introducing programming for automation and exploring advanced methods for producing and visualizing surfaces and data. It increases students proficiency in the application of GIS and prepares them to conduct sophisticated spatial analyses. (Format: Lecture/Laboratory 3 Hours)(Exclusion: GENS 4951 Advanced Geographic Information Systems) Tuesday 8:30 to 11:20AM Avard Dixon 115.
This course examines current issues in environmental science. Students prepare case studies of specific problem areas in environmental science and present these in a seminar format. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)(Exclusion: ENVS 4901) Wednesday 2:30 to 5:20PM Avard Dixon G9.
This course examines the structure and function of freshwater ecosystems. It emphasizes the physical, chemical, and biological processes that occur within lakes and, to a lesser extent, river and wetland environments. The course also covers the diversity of, and interactions between, major biological communities in lakes and highlights environmental stressors that threaten freshwaters. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: GENS 3991 Stressors on Freshwater Systems; GENS 3991 Limnology) Monday Wednesday and Friday 10:30 to 11:50AM Avard Dixon G10.
This course integrates atmospheric, oceanographic, geological and biological concepts with a historical perspective to introduce the major processes that have shaped Earths environment. The course examines climatic processes on geological time scales, the evolution of organisms, the cycling of elements, and the feedbacks between these processes.(Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: ENVS 3001) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Avard Dixon G9.
This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for GENS 2991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Avard Dixon 120.
This course highlights elements of weather and climate including the composition and thermal structure of the atmosphere, radiation and energy balances, global circulation, air masses, fronts and atmospheric disturbances, and climates of the world. It places special emphasis on recent climatic changes in the environment. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: GEOG 2421) Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 to 11:20AM Crabtree M14.