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This course introduces the essential ideas of topology. Topics include: metric and topological spaces, convergence, continuous functions, connected spaces, compact spaces, and homotopy. (Format: Lecture 3 hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 11:30 to 12:20PM Sir James Dunn Building 406.
This course introduces terminology, techniques, and applications of graph theory and examines parameters for a variety of classes of graphs. Topics include trees, planarity, colouring, matchings, and network flow problems. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: Any version of MATH 3251 previously offered with a different title.) Monday Wednesday and Friday 12:30 to 1:20PM Avard Dixon 120.
This course covers analytic functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations, conformal mapping, complex integrals, Cauchys integral theorem, Taylor and Laurent Series, residues,evaluation of real integrals, and inverse transforms. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours; Exclusion MATH 4131) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Avard Dixon G10.
This course introduces the nature of theoretical mathematical modelling illustrated by examples drawn from the physical sciences, population dynamics (mathematical ecology), traffic flow, sociological problems (for example voting, kinship and cultural stability) and other areas depending on the interests of the class. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 to 12:50PM Hart Hall 101.
This is a second course in the concepts and techniques of probability and statistics. The course covers a selection of topics from analysis of variance, linear and nonlinear regression, correlation estimation and prediction, independence, Wilcoxon and goodness-of-fit tests and includes data analysis using statistical software. Examples come from a wide variety of sources and disciplines. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1 Hour) Monday Wednesday and Friday 9:30 to 10:20AM Avard Dixon 118.
This course introduces linear algebra and its applications. Topics may include: linear equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations, inner products, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Whenever possible, the course provides geometric interpretation in two- and three-dimensional space. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) Monday Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to 9:20AM Avard Dixon 118.
This course introduces first and second order differential equations. Topics include techniques for solving simple differential equations and the qualitative analysis of linear and non-linear equations. Applications include growth and decay, heating and cooling, and mixing and chemical reactions. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of MATH 2121 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 1:30 to 2:20PM Sir James Dunn Building 106.
This course continues the introduction to calculus begun in MATH 1111. Topics include techniques of integration; applications of the integral such as finding volumes and solving elementary differential equations; and sequences and series. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1.5 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of MATH 1121 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 1:30 to 2:20PM Crabtree M14.
This course introduces differential calculus. Topics include derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric, and exponential functions and applications such as curve sketching, related rates, and optimization problems. [Note 1: This course has a Challenge for Credit option; see Calendar Section 3.11] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1.5 Hours)(Distribution: Natural Science-a) (Exclusion: MATH 1151; any version of MATH 1111 previously offered with a different title) Monday Wednesday and Friday 1:30 to 2:20PM Sir James Dunn Building 113.