Help with Search courses

This course provides an introduction to contemporary Canada as represented by its key social, political, and economic institutions. It examines the nature and character of Canadian institutions, communities, and values. (Exclusion: CANA 2001)

This course provides an introduction to Canadian culture and identity.  It examines key Canadian symbols and myths and various forms of cultural expression, including film, the arts, literature, and music in relation to Canadian national identity.  (Format: Lecture/Tutorial 3 Hours) (Exclusion: CANA 2011)

This course facilitates community literacy through the analysis of the narratives that groups and institutions develop about themselves or others in order to perform certain functions of community. The word "narratives" is understood broadly and includes such factors as community programming, local events and practices, religious observances, material culture, natural and historical sites, local myths and practices, and family histories. Using a range of relevant critical tools, and focusing on local community contexts, students examine these cultural texts for the shared values and complex identities that they evidence.

This course introduces quantitative tools used in business decision making and the conventions and terminologies used in the application of these tools. Topics include: discounting, markups and markdowns, breakeven analysis, interest calculations, and the mathematics of finance. (Exclusion: Commerce 1991 Quantitative Analysis for Business Decision Making)

This course introduces the study of Economics and the nature of macroeconomic problems such as the determinants of the level of national income, employment, and the accompanying stabilization problems and policies. Topics also include money and banking, international trade, exchange rates, and the problems of inflation. [Note 1: Students should normally have completed a university preparatory level course in Mathematics.]  (Exclusion: ECON 1000)

This course introduces the study of Economics and the nature of macroeconomic problems such as the determinants of the level of national income, employment, and the accompanying stabilization problems and policies. Topics also include money and banking, international trade, exchange rates, and the problems of inflation. [Note 1: Students should normally have completed a university preparatory level course in Mathematics.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1 Hour) (Exclusion: ECON 1000)

This course, offered in several sections each year, introduces students to critical approaches to the reading of, and writing about, literature. Each section has its own reading list, set by the individual instructor and including a balanced representation of prose, fiction, poetry and drama, taken from a range of historical periods.[Note 1: Students who wish to pursue courses in English at the 2000 level and above must take ENGL 1201. (Exclusion: ENGL 1001)

The "crisis" in Crisis Lit refers to the context and content for the texts that we will study. Each week will be organized around one of the four horsemen of the Crisis Lit apocalypses: epidemiological, ecological, existential, and economic. How do storytellers represent crisis? What crisis represents, as we will discover, is a decisive historical moment, when our political grounding shifts towards the worse or the better-oppression or emancipation. As vital as they are, the poems, short stories, films, essays, and songs that we explore cannot resolve crises, but they can help us to better understand how we got there and what future crises we may be sowing. We will encounter a variety of inspiring figures working in genres such as horror, science fiction, dream pop, and creative non-fiction. The course will be structured with mini-lectures on a given crisis, artistic form, and cultural response, from Edgar Allan Poe, the short story, and the cholera epidemic to Parasite , film, and the global market collapse. Evaluation will be based on fun and critically engaging written assignments and interactive online discussion.

In this course, students will unpack how several genres and forms of popular literature address issues of gender. Selected texts may include spy fiction, horror, memoir, and chick lit, and will invite students to deconstruct the discourse between texts and the realities that produced and consumed them. At the same time, students will explore gendered themes and tropes central to each of these genres. How does who we are shape what we read, and how? How do different genres impact how we understand and conceptualize gender? What stereotypes are created, reinforced, or challenged through popular texts? *ENGL1991: Gender and Genre may also be counted as a Women's and Gender Studies elective. Students interested pursuing this designation must contact the Director of Women's and Gender Studies while they are enrolled in this course.

This course examines themes in North American history from the sixteenth century to the 1860s, with a particular emphasis on the interaction of Indigenous, European, and West African peoples, and on the formation of the new states.  (Exclusion: any version of HIST 1601 previously offered with a different title)

This course introduces students to the political, socio-economic, and cultural history of Canada from the pre-European period to the first federal census. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)  (Exclusion: HIST 2410, 3100, 3250)

This course examines the socio-economic, political, and cultural life of Canada from the time of the first federal census in 1871 to the present. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)  (Exclusion: HIST 2410, 3100, 3250)

*Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course traces the decline of the aristocracy, the triumph of the middle classes, and the making of the working class in Britain during the early stages of capitalism and industrialization. The course also examines gender relations and analyses the notion of 'separate spheres'. It pays particular attention to the controversies among historians surrounding the nature of social transformation in Britain. (Exclusion: HIST 3400; any version of HIST 3251 previously offered with a different title)

*Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course traces the development of political movements and ideas that are an integral part of the texture of modern Canada and that have been shaping influences on the direction and pace of social, intellectual, and economic life.

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisites set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for LATI 3991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)  

This course focuses on the real number system, inequalities, plane analytic geometry (lines and conics), functions, inverse functions, polynomials, rational functions, trigonometric functions, and exponential and logarithmic functions. It emphasizes fundamental methods of graphing functions, using non-calculus based techniques. [Note 1: This course is primarily intended for non-science students or as a prerequisite for MATH 1111 or 1151 for those students who have not passed the Mathematics Placement Test. Science students who have passed the Mathematics Placement Test require the permission of the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science to enrol in this course. Credit will not be given for this course if credit has already been granted for MATH 1111 or 1151.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1.5 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of MATH 1011 previously offered with a different title) 

This course introduces differential calculus. Topics include derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric, and exponential functions and applications such as curve sketching, related rates, and optimization problems. [Note 1: This course has a Challenge for Credit option; see Calendar Section 3.11] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1.5 Hours)(Exclusion: MATH 1151; any version of MATH 1111 previously offered with a different title)

This course is an introduction to fundamental concepts of music theory, including notation and technical terminology, as well as to listening, singing, and keyboard skills. [Note 1: This course is not available for credit for the Bachelor of Music program. Credit will not be given for this course if credit has already been granted for MUSC 1011, 1101, or 1111.]

This course is an introduction to the foundations of politics through the medium of political theory, Canadian politics, comparative politics, or international politics.  (Exclusion: POLS 1000)

*Prereq: POLS 1001; or permission of the Department
This course introduces several of the major theories, structures, processes, and issues in international relations. After introducing the current theoretical approaches to the study of global politics, the course addresses a series of topics from among the following: systems of global governance; the concept 'terrorism'; non-state actors in global politics such as corporations, social movements, and non-governmental organizations; human rights and human security; gender and international politics; poverty,'development', and inequality; and the environment.[Note 1: This course is cross-listed as INLR 2301 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Exclusion: Any version of INLR/POLS 2301 previously offered with a different title)

*Prereq: 6 credits from POLS at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course examines the political process in the United States. It presents an overview of the constitution, institutions, and political actors that represent the essential components of American political culture and government. It may also focus on one or more important policy areas. (Exclusion: POLS 2201)

This course introduces the concepts, problems, and methods of modern scientific psychology. Topics include neuroanatomy and other aspects of the biological bases of psychological processes, learning, motivation, sensation, perception, aspects of cognition, memory, and language.  [Note: PSYC 1001 and 1011 may be taken in either order; neither is a prerequisite to the other.]

This course introduces the concepts, problems, and methods of modern scientific psychology. Topics include: attitudes, stereotyping and other aspects of social psychology, developmental psychology, intelligence, aspects of cognition and language, personality, and the psychology of abnormal behaviour. [Note: PSYC 1001 and 1011 may be taken in either order; neither is a prerequisite to the other. ]

This course examines the history, beliefs, practices, and contemporary socio-cultural significance of what are conventionally called the Western religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course also briefly examines Ancient Near Eastern religions (Egyptian and Mesopotamian), Greco-Roman paganism, as well as Zoroastrianism and Baha'i. (Exclusion: RELG 2201)

*Prereq: 3 credits from RELG 1671, 2801; 3 credits from RELG at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course traces Islam from its origins in the life and activities of Mohammed through to contemporary world Islam and its diverse responses to the challenges of "modernity" and the West. The world view, institutions, rituals, and practices of Islam will be studied within these changing historical and cultural contexts. Effort will be made throughout to gain insight into the religious, spiritual impulses which animate Islam and unite devout Muslims. (Exclusion: RELG 3291)

*Prereq: SOCI 1001; or permission of the Department
This course explores the major theoretical frameworks of sociology and the conceptual tools used to examine intersecting social relations embedded in everyday practices. It focuses on understanding how biographical characteristics are influenced by impersonal historical forces and significant structural transformations of society. The examination of sociological imagination lays the foundation for understanding how to differentiate between 'personal troubles' and 'public issues'.

*Prereq: Take SOCI 1201 or permission of the department
This course examines sexual attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors from a sociological perspective, exploring how the biology of sex is sociologically constructed. It examines and explores theoretical and conceptual issues and empirical research and directs students to think about sexuality analytically and critically and to develop a sociological understanding of diverse issues. Topics include: sexual identity and its construction and regulation; sexuality and the Enlightenment; science and sex; ethics and social institutions; and the relationship between sexuality and the socio-political process.  (Exclusion: SOCI 2991 Sociology of Sex and Sexuality)

*Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course provides the opportunity for students to apply sociological theories and perspectives to the development and analysis of social policies and programs. Social policy is the arena in which citizens, professionals, non-governmental organizations, social movements, and government address the social inequities underlying the lived realities of individuals. The course leads to an understanding of how sociology can be applied in researching, developing, analyzing, and implementing 'real world' social policies and programs. (Exclusion: SOCI 3991 Social Policy)

This course provides hands-on opportunities for students to gain practical skills and experience in service sociology, a socially responsible and mission-oriented sociology of action and alleviation, through public service, social action, and community engagement. It provides an opportunity for students to learn from experienced professionals and acquire relevant skills that can be applied in the work or voluntary sector. Students gain theoretical and methodological understanding of the interventions available for community-based engagement.